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 1 
 on: Today at 10:37 AM 
Started by ari moshe - Last post by ari moshe
Hi everyone!
Next week we will begin with applying the EA paradigm: Pluto, Pluto polarity point and the lunar nodes.
For those who still intend to post on the lunar nodes practice - feel free to post whenever even if its after we move on to the next step. Just let me know if you still intend to post.
With love,
Ari Moshe

 2 
 on: Today at 10:34 AM 
Started by ari moshe - Last post by ari moshe
Hi Katherine, the line that was a great insight for me was:

Quote
The Soul recognizes that the frontier is now relating to others via the polarity point: North Node in Libra and the 7th house.  The real beauty here is that it is still true to the deepest desires of the Soul to create new experiences that break through existing limitations!

By embracing the polarity NOTHING true or necessary is actually lost, rather it only enhances the soul's capacity for growth in all areas of its life. Only from the point of view of resistance does the polarity seem to be threatening. We can apply that line of thinking to every sn/nn polarity.

 3 
 on: Today at 06:20 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Analysis: Pig Putin likely to ignore West on Ukraine

Since he took over Crimea, President Pig V. Putin has seen his popularity soar and his opposition fall silent. So when the U.S. vice president told Russia to defuse tensions in Ukraine, Putin had few reasons to listen.

By LYNN BERRY
Associated Press
MOSCOW —

Since he took over Crimea, President Pig Putin has seen his popularity soar and his opposition fall silent. So when the U.S. vice president told Russia to defuse tensions in Ukraine, Putin had few reasons to listen.Emboldened by the national euphoria over the annexation of Crimea, Pig has moved against the few remaining critical voices in Russia and further neutered the news media. On Tuesday, a court cleared the way for sending his most vocal critic to prison.

Opposition leader Alexei Navalny was found guilty of slandering a lawmaker and fined the equivalent of $8,400. As a result, he may be jailed during a trial in a second case that starts Thursday. If found guilty, he could be sent to prison.

Navalny was nearly jailed last summer, when he was running a high-profile mayoral campaign in Moscow, but his conviction brought thousands into the streets in protest. The Kremlin evidently calculated it would be better to allow him to run for mayor, but he surprised everyone by finishing a strong second with 27 percent of the vote.

But now Pig, with his approval rating at 80 percent, no longer appears willing to tolerate any criticism.
Chillingly, Pig has begun to cast his critics as "national traitors," an intimation that anyone who opposes the Kremlin is serving the interests of the West. He has compared Russians who oppose his aggressive actions in Ukraine to the Bolsheviks, who took advantage of Russia's defeat in World War I to stage their 1917 revolution.

Navalny, who for years has led a relentless effort to expose government corruption, wrote an opinion column for The New York Times last month that urged the U.S. to impose sanctions on the Pig’s closest friends as punishment for the takeover of Crimea. The next day, five of the nine people Navalny mentioned were hit. He understood that the Kremlin would make him pay for taking delight in the sanctions. "Time to pack a bag for jail," said a post on his Twitter feed.

The travel bans and asset freezes imposed on Russian officials by the U.S. and European Union have been greeted publicly by bravado and ridicule in Moscow, with those targeted proclaiming themselves proud to have made the sanctions list. But the sanctions have hurt Russia's economy by spooking investors and driving up inflation as the ruble has lost value. The U.S. and EU have said they will broaden the list and impose more punishment against Russia's banking and energy sectors if Moscow fails to follow through on the provisions of an international agreement on Ukraine reached last week in Geneva.

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said Russia must quickly "stop talking and start acting" to reduce tensions in Ukraine if it wants to avoid more sanctions. "We will not allow this to become an open-ended process," he said Tuesday in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital. The visit was a show of U.S. support for Ukraine's interim government, which took over after the pro-Moscow president was ousted in February following months of protests and is struggling to hold the country together.

After Moscow seized Crimea, pro-Russian militias began taking over government buildings throughout southeastern Ukraine and setting up checkpoints on roads. Russia also has tens of thousands of troops arrayed along its side of the border. Biden urged Moscow to encourage the pro-Russia forces to stand down and "address their grievances politically."

The threat of violence only increased, however. Ukraine's acting president reported late Tuesday that the bodies of two people he said were abducted by pro-Russia insurgents were found and a military aircraft was reportedly hit by gunfire. Acting President Oleksandr Turchynov ordered security forces to resume "anti-terror" operations in the east, although previous ones have had little effect.

Russia has denied that it has been stoking the turmoil or has failed to live up to the Geneva agreement.
Pig has little interest in seeing an easing of tensions in eastern Ukraine, which he has described as historically Russian lands and part of what he calls the "Russian world." The government in Kiev and many in the West believe that provoking a confrontation would give Russia a pretext to invade. Putin has said he hopes he won't have to send in troops but retains the right to do so if necessary to protect ethnic Russians, a sizeable minority in Ukraine's east.

Pig Putin's ultimate goal is to prevent Ukraine from moving closer to the European Union and NATO. How he intends to do this is still an open question. But with dissenting voices at home falling silent, Pig may only need to see how far the West is willing to go.

 4 
 on: Today at 05:57 AM 
Started by cat777 - Last post by Rad
Hi Skywalker,

Sure, if you feel like focusing on the Neptune transit as it applies to the collective, and the individual, then please feel free to do so. If so, just start a new thread that you could call "Neptune transit'. If you do then I certainly will contribute as well as others I would suspect. And, later on, we could add this to the Neptune book as a revised version.

God Bless, Rad

 5 
 on: Today at 05:07 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
SPIEGEL ONLINE
04/22/2014 05:53 PM

The Propaganda War: Opposition Sings Kremlin Tune on Ukraine

By Christian Neef and Matthias Schepp in Moscow

The propaganda war in the Ukraine crisis has spawned a renewal Russian nationalism, with members of the opposition and the intellectual class suddenly praising Pig Putin. Many in Russia are accepting the Kremlin's official line uncritically.

Perhaps Alexander Byvshev was a little naïve. Maybe he thought his small village was somehow a safe haven from the world of global politics. But how wrong he was.

Byvshev, a German teacher in the district of Orlov, recently opened up his local newspaper, Sarya, or "the dawn," only to find his name featured in a prominent slot. "In these troubled times, when enemies outside the country are showing their teeth and preparing to take the leap of death, you can find people who would like to undermine Russia from within," the newspaper wrote. "People like A. Byvshev."

How did Byvshev wind up in the newspaper? All it took was a short poem he wrote and posted on VK, Russia's popular social network answer to Facebook. He had directed the poem at "patriot cheerleaders" who uncritically follow Moscow's propaganda. "From a very early age, I have been accustomed to not telling lies," Byvshev says. "If Russia stole Crimea from Ukraine, then one has to speak openly about the fact that it was theft."

'No Place for Patriots Like This in Russia'

It's an openness that hasn't done him much good recently. "There's No Place for Patriots Like This in Russia," blared the headline of the article about Byvshev. Acquaintances stopped greeting him, local businesses began ignoring his presence and now the local regional prosecutor is threatening to press charges against him for "incitement to hatred." He faces two years behind bars if convicted.

It is an incident reminiscent of the 1930s, an era when the line between Communist and public enemy was a fine one. At the time, Stalin had hundreds of thousands of so-called enemies of the people shot and killed.

Today, Moscow's territorial claims in Ukraine have unleashed a sense of nationalism so aggressive that it has silenced virtually all critical voices. Indeed, it is a singular official view that appears to have prevailed in Russia -- namely that a clique in Kiev, with American support, is seeking to destroy Ukraine despite heroic efforts by millions in the eastern part of the country. And that these people need Russia's support.

The ability to differentiate appears to have evaporated and the state propaganda machine has become as effective as it is comprehensive. The media seem to be following it in lockstep, as evidenced last week. "Ukraine Is Waging War against Its Own People" read the front page of one issue of Rossiyskaya Gazeta, the official Russian government newspaper, in response to the decision by the interim government early last week to send troops to the eastern part of the country. The "Kiev junta" wants to "bombard the Donbas," commented Russia's largest-circulation daily, Komsomolskaya Pravda, adding: "Our people are mourning the dead and injured." "Sloviansk is covered in blood," claimed the tabloid Tyov Den ("Your Day"). None of these reports is true.

Have Russians Become Gullible?

The problem is that people in Russia these days seem to believe almost every false report that comes out of Moscow, and few are questioning their accuracy. New channel Russia 24 unceasingly shows Ukrainians in the eastern part of the country holding machine guns and grenade launchers. But nobody in Russia bothers to ask where they are getting their arms from.

Russian President Pig Putin, the man ostensibly rushing to the aid of Russians in Ukraine, is the hero of the day. Finally, Russians seem to believe, he is paying the West back for years of humiliation. And yet the justifications the Pig has provided could hardly be more cynical.

Last Wednesday, the Pig snorted the escalation of the crisis in eastern Ukraine to be the product of the "irresponsible and unconstitutional policies of the regime in Kiev," which, he claimed had used the army to suppress the protests of peaceful citizens in the region. Yet to that point, there had been little activity by the army. During the Maidan square revolt, he called for the exact opposite: Putin said the military must use force to stop the protests.

Nationalist Delirium

Moscow is acting as though it were located just behind the front lines. Indeed, the pull of nationalist delirium has become so strong that even Putin's own opponents seem no longer capable of resisting it.

Only two years ago, Sergei Udaltsov, along with blogger and opposition politician Alexei Navalny, was one of the most eloquent speakers at anti-Putin protests in Moscow. He has been under house arrest since 2013 on charges he sought to incite mass riots. Despite his situation, even Udaltsov has declared his support for Russia's actions and its annexation of Crimea. "I am a supporter of direct democracy, and I welcome the Crimea referendum as an expression of popular government," he recently stated.

Blogger and attorney Navalny has also been placed under house arrest and is banned from using the telephone or the Internet. That didn't stop him from writing an interview with himself, which was then distributed by his family. In it, he claims that Crimea was given to Ukraine in an act of "unlawful arbitrariness" by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in 1954 that is still offensive today, even to normal Russians. He also offers some pseudo consolation to Ukrainians: "To hell with Crimea. Why do you need it, anyway?"

A Divided Intelligentsia

At a time when polls indicate that 80 percent of Russians are backing their president, it is difficult to be both a patriot and a critic of the Kremlin. Those who would criticize the government become the object of close scrutiny. The annexation of Crimea and the battle for eastern Ukraine has divided not only Putin's opponents, it seems, but also Russia's intelligentsia.

On the one side, around 500 members of the Russian creative community recently signed a letter in support of the Pig, including star conductor Valery Gergiev. On the other, authors Victor Erofeyev and Lyudmila Ulitskay, along with 900 other artists, signed their names to a petition condemning the annexation and warning against a possible war with Ukraine.

Sitting in her office in a historical building in central Moscow, Irina Prokhorova, chairwoman of the opposition party Civic Platform, laments the current situation. "It's almost as if we've returned to the Soviet era," she says, "a time when all discussions about government decisions were prohibited." The building belongs to her brother Mikhail, a billionaire who ran for president in 2012 on a platform of ensuring greater democracy and a stronger free market economy. He ultimately garnered 8 percent of the vote, a respectable result.

Iron Curtain Lite?

Prokhorova sees in the enthusiasm over the annexation of Crimea a "nostalgic return to the imperialist past." "Earlier, people with differing political convictions had mutual respect for each other," she says. "But now even friendships are breaking up. A witch hunt has begun." She warns that Russia is steering itself on a course toward a "civil cold war."

Reknowned historian Andrey Zubov, until recently a professor at Russia's elite MGIMO foreign policy university, experienced that first hand not long ago. Zubov got dismissed from his professorship earlier this month after comparing Putin's annexation of Crimea with Hitler's 1938 Anschluss of Austria. Fervent Russian patriots also want to strip the country's most famous rock star, Andrey Makarevich, of all honors ever bestowed him because he dared to protest against the Kremlin's Ukraine policies.

Other intellectuals, like former television executive Nikolai Svanidze, are more cautious and view themselves not as members of the opposition, but as a "liberal and democratic part of the political elite." Although Svanidze considers Crimea to be Russian territory, he rejects the methods used to annex it as well as the actions of forces in eastern Ukraine he believes are steered by Russia. He says he now fears the creation of an "Iron Curtain Lite," the "archaization and Sovietization of our domestic politics" and major economic problems in the mid-term.

A few newspapers do still throw light on the thoughts of the liberal wing of the Moscow elite, despite their current silence. And the Kremlin still tolerates their existence -- no doubt due to their low circulations.

Articles printed in Nezavisimaya Gazeta openly state that the majority of Ukrainians are opposed to annexation by Russia -- even in Donetsk in eastern Ukraine -- and that militant forces there are receiving their orders from Russians who have traveled into the region. They have also run stories on how so-called civil defense forces somehow managed to open several weapons depots. And that they were miraculously able to disarm the 25th Separate Dnipropetrovsk Airborne Brigade and now possess tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery and all sorts of ammunition.

Intelligent and Uncensored

The views published in the daily Vedomosti are even more vehemently critical of Kremlin policy. The newspaper, owned by a major Russian media company, was founded in 1866. In recent months, it has become the spiritual home of critical intellectuals.

Vedomosti doesn't follow any ideology and isn't financed by any political party or oligarch. The newspaper largely covers business and economics and it is read by virtually every political camp because of the market reports.

What sets the newspaper apart, however, is the fact that it can afford its own staff of columnists, which includes historians, philologists and theologians who sit in a glass-walled office at the center of the editorial offices. They are surrounded by bookshelves that include the Bible, English-language encyclopedias and even the works of forgotten Russian anarchists. This glass box is one of the few places in Russia where Kremlin politics are still commented on each day in an intelligent and uncensored manner.

"We were always centrists," says 37-year-old editorial writer Nikolai Epple, "but now that Russian leaders have gone mad, we're automatically shifting to the left."

During Soviet times, everyone knew that official statements were propaganda, Epple says. People would just laugh and joke about them with friends behind closed doors. "But now many believe the reports coming out of Ukraine -- and that is dangerous," he warns. "It gives you the feeling that something terrible is happening in modern-day Russia."

Epple just finished writing an editorial about the "special path" that Russia pursued time and again in the past. "Russia's drift away from Europe that has been happening since the 1990s has once again turned us into an island civilization," he argues. Epple says the Kremlin believes its job has less to do with communicating with the rest of the world and more with holding together its area of power from alleged attacks by foreign enemies. "He's trying to create another Cordon sanitaire," he explains. "And he is surrounding himself with areas that are ailing economically or are torn apart by ethnic conflicts."

Despite editorials in that vein, there hasn't been any public pressure exerted on his newspaper, the journalist says. "Still, the atmosphere is getting more ominous. It already takes some courage to write that Kiev's new leaders aren't fascists. I wonder each day of there is anyone who is capable of putting the brakes on the hysteria in our country?"

Translated from the German by Daryl Lindsey

 6 
 on: Today at 05:06 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
SPIEGEL ONLINE
04/22/2014 05:53 PM

The Propaganda War: Opposition Sings Kremlin Tune on Ukraine

By Christian Neef and Matthias Schepp in Moscow

The propaganda war in the Ukraine crisis has spawned a renewal Russian nationalism, with members of the opposition and the intellectual class suddenly praising Pig Putin. Many in Russia are accepting the Kremlin's official line uncritically.

Perhaps Alexander Byvshev was a little naïve. Maybe he thought his small village was somehow a safe haven from the world of global politics. But how wrong he was.

Byvshev, a German teacher in the district of Orlov, recently opened up his local newspaper, Sarya, or "the dawn," only to find his name featured in a prominent slot. "In these troubled times, when enemies outside the country are showing their teeth and preparing to take the leap of death, you can find people who would like to undermine Russia from within," the newspaper wrote. "People like A. Byvshev."

How did Byvshev wind up in the newspaper? All it took was a short poem he wrote and posted on VK, Russia's popular social network answer to Facebook. He had directed the poem at "patriot cheerleaders" who uncritically follow Moscow's propaganda. "From a very early age, I have been accustomed to not telling lies," Byvshev says. "If Russia stole Crimea from Ukraine, then one has to speak openly about the fact that it was theft."

'No Place for Patriots Like This in Russia'

It's an openness that hasn't done him much good recently. "There's No Place for Patriots Like This in Russia," blared the headline of the article about Byvshev. Acquaintances stopped greeting him, local businesses began ignoring his presence and now the local regional prosecutor is threatening to press charges against him for "incitement to hatred." He faces two years behind bars if convicted.

It is an incident reminiscent of the 1930s, an era when the line between Communist and public enemy was a fine one. At the time, Stalin had hundreds of thousands of so-called enemies of the people shot and killed.

Today, Moscow's territorial claims in Ukraine have unleashed a sense of nationalism so aggressive that it has silenced virtually all critical voices. Indeed, it is a singular official view that appears to have prevailed in Russia -- namely that a clique in Kiev, with American support, is seeking to destroy Ukraine despite heroic efforts by millions in the eastern part of the country. And that these people need Russia's support.

The ability to differentiate appears to have evaporated and the state propaganda machine has become as effective as it is comprehensive. The media seem to be following it in lockstep, as evidenced last week. "Ukraine Is Waging War against Its Own People" read the front page of one issue of Rossiyskaya Gazeta, the official Russian government newspaper, in response to the decision by the interim government early last week to send troops to the eastern part of the country. The "Kiev junta" wants to "bombard the Donbas," commented Russia's largest-circulation daily, Komsomolskaya Pravda, adding: "Our people are mourning the dead and injured." "Sloviansk is covered in blood," claimed the tabloid Tyov Den ("Your Day"). None of these reports is true.

Have Russians Become Gullible?

The problem is that people in Russia these days seem to believe almost every false report that comes out of Moscow, and few are questioning their accuracy. New channel Russia 24 unceasingly shows Ukrainians in the eastern part of the country holding machine guns and grenade launchers. But nobody in Russia bothers to ask where they are getting their arms from.

Russian President Pig Putin, the man ostensibly rushing to the aid of Russians in Ukraine, is the hero of the day. Finally, Russians seem to believe, he is paying the West back for years of humiliation. And yet the justifications the Pig has provided could hardly be more cynical.

Last Wednesday, the Pig snorted the escalation of the crisis in eastern Ukraine to be the product of the "irresponsible and unconstitutional policies of the regime in Kiev," which, he claimed had used the army to suppress the protests of peaceful citizens in the region. Yet to that point, there had been little activity by the army. During the Maidan square revolt, he called for the exact opposite: Putin said the military must use force to stop the protests.

Nationalist Delirium

Moscow is acting as though it were located just behind the front lines. Indeed, the pull of nationalist delirium has become so strong that even Putin's own opponents seem no longer capable of resisting it.

Only two years ago, Sergei Udaltsov, along with blogger and opposition politician Alexei Navalny, was one of the most eloquent speakers at anti-Putin protests in Moscow. He has been under house arrest since 2013 on charges he sought to incite mass riots. Despite his situation, even Udaltsov has declared his support for Russia's actions and its annexation of Crimea. "I am a supporter of direct democracy, and I welcome the Crimea referendum as an expression of popular government," he recently stated.

Blogger and attorney Navalny has also been placed under house arrest and is banned from using the telephone or the Internet. That didn't stop him from writing an interview with himself, which was then distributed by his family. In it, he claims that Crimea was given to Ukraine in an act of "unlawful arbitrariness" by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in 1954 that is still offensive today, even to normal Russians. He also offers some pseudo consolation to Ukrainians: "To hell with Crimea. Why do you need it, anyway?"

A Divided Intelligentsia

At a time when polls indicate that 80 percent of Russians are backing their president, it is difficult to be both a patriot and a critic of the Kremlin. Those who would criticize the government become the object of close scrutiny. The annexation of Crimea and the battle for eastern Ukraine has divided not only Putin's opponents, it seems, but also Russia's intelligentsia.

On the one side, around 500 members of the Russian creative community recently signed a letter in support of the Pig, including star conductor Valery Gergiev. On the other, authors Victor Erofeyev and Lyudmila Ulitskay, along with 900 other artists, signed their names to a petition condemning the annexation and warning against a possible war with Ukraine.

Sitting in her office in a historical building in central Moscow, Irina Prokhorova, chairwoman of the opposition party Civic Platform, laments the current situation. "It's almost as if we've returned to the Soviet era," she says, "a time when all discussions about government decisions were prohibited." The building belongs to her brother Mikhail, a billionaire who ran for president in 2012 on a platform of ensuring greater democracy and a stronger free market economy. He ultimately garnered 8 percent of the vote, a respectable result.

Iron Curtain Lite?

Prokhorova sees in the enthusiasm over the annexation of Crimea a "nostalgic return to the imperialist past." "Earlier, people with differing political convictions had mutual respect for each other," she says. "But now even friendships are breaking up. A witch hunt has begun." She warns that Russia is steering itself on a course toward a "civil cold war."

Reknowned historian Andrey Zubov, until recently a professor at Russia's elite MGIMO foreign policy university, experienced that first hand not long ago. Zubov got dismissed from his professorship earlier this month after comparing Putin's annexation of Crimea with Hitler's 1938 Anschluss of Austria. Fervent Russian patriots also want to strip the country's most famous rock star, Andrey Makarevich, of all honors ever bestowed him because he dared to protest against the Kremlin's Ukraine policies.

Other intellectuals, like former television executive Nikolai Svanidze, are more cautious and view themselves not as members of the opposition, but as a "liberal and democratic part of the political elite." Although Svanidze considers Crimea to be Russian territory, he rejects the methods used to annex it as well as the actions of forces in eastern Ukraine he believes are steered by Russia. He says he now fears the creation of an "Iron Curtain Lite," the "archaization and Sovietization of our domestic politics" and major economic problems in the mid-term.

A few newspapers do still throw light on the thoughts of the liberal wing of the Moscow elite, despite their current silence. And the Kremlin still tolerates their existence -- no doubt due to their low circulations.

Articles printed in Nezavisimaya Gazeta openly state that the majority of Ukrainians are opposed to annexation by Russia -- even in Donetsk in eastern Ukraine -- and that militant forces there are receiving their orders from Russians who have traveled into the region. They have also run stories on how so-called civil defense forces somehow managed to open several weapons depots. And that they were miraculously able to disarm the 25th Separate Dnipropetrovsk Airborne Brigade and now possess tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery and all sorts of ammunition.

Intelligent and Uncensored

The views published in the daily Vedomosti are even more vehemently critical of Kremlin policy. The newspaper, owned by a major Russian media company, was founded in 1866. In recent months, it has become the spiritual home of critical intellectuals.

Vedomosti doesn't follow any ideology and isn't financed by any political party or oligarch. The newspaper largely covers business and economics and it is read by virtually every political camp because of the market reports.

What sets the newspaper apart, however, is the fact that it can afford its own staff of columnists, which includes historians, philologists and theologians who sit in a glass-walled office at the center of the editorial offices. They are surrounded by bookshelves that include the Bible, English-language encyclopedias and even the works of forgotten Russian anarchists. This glass box is one of the few places in Russia where Kremlin politics are still commented on each day in an intelligent and uncensored manner.

"We were always centrists," says 37-year-old editorial writer Nikolai Epple, "but now that Russian leaders have gone mad, we're automatically shifting to the left."

During Soviet times, everyone knew that official statements were propaganda, Epple says. People would just laugh and joke about them with friends behind closed doors. "But now many believe the reports coming out of Ukraine -- and that is dangerous," he warns. "It gives you the feeling that something terrible is happening in modern-day Russia."

Epple just finished writing an editorial about the "special path" that Russia pursued time and again in the past. "Russia's drift away from Europe that has been happening since the 1990s has once again turned us into an island civilization," he argues. Epple says the Kremlin believes its job has less to do with communicating with the rest of the world and more with holding together its area of power from alleged attacks by foreign enemies. "He's trying to create another Cordon sanitaire," he explains. "And he is surrounding himself with areas that are ailing economically or are torn apart by ethnic conflicts."

Despite editorials in that vein, there hasn't been any public pressure exerted on his newspaper, the journalist says. "Still, the atmosphere is getting more ominous. It already takes some courage to write that Kiev's new leaders aren't fascists. I wonder each day of there is anyone who is capable of putting the brakes on the hysteria in our country?"

Translated from the German by Daryl Lindsey

 7 
 on: Today at 04:56 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Russia Threatens Response if Interests Attacked in Ukraine

by Naharnet Newsdesk
23 April 2014, 06:43

Russia issued a blunt warning Wednesday it would respond if its interests are attacked in Ukraine, as pro-Kremlin rebels in the restive east of the country braced for a new military offensive by Kiev.

The threat by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, recalling the 2008 war with Georgia over South Ossetia, came as U.S. troops were headed to region in a show of force after Washington again warned Moscow of new sanctions over the escalating crisis.

"If we are attacked, we would certainly respond. If our interests, our legitimate interests, the interests of Russians have been attacked directly, like they were in South Ossetia for example, I do not see any other way but to respond in accordance with international law," Lavrov told state-controlled RT television.

The United States said it plans to deploy 600 troops to Poland and the Baltic states starting Wednesday to "reassure our allies and partners".

Ukraine's acting president Oleksandr Turchynov late Tuesday ordered a new "anti-terrorist" operation against separatists holding a string of eastern towns after the discovery of two "brutally tortured" bodies.

One of the dead was a local politician from Turchynov's party who was kidnapped nearly a week ago, the leader said, blaming his death on the rebels.

Kiev's offensive threatens to sound the final death knell for an already tattered agreement struck last week in Geneva between Ukraine, Russia and the West to ease the crisis, which some fear could tip the country into civil war.

"Security agencies are working to liquidate all the groups currently operating in Kramatorsk, Slavyansk and the other towns in the Donetsk and Lugansk regions," said Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Yarema, according to the Interfax Ukraine news agency.

- Calm in flashpoint town -

In the eastern town of Slavyansk, a tense flashpoint town near where the two bodies were found, the streets were calm, with locals walking about as usual.

A handful of rebels wearing camouflage gear and ski masks but with no apparent weapons stood outside the barricaded town hall they are occupying.

In front of the building were displayed three photos of militants who were killed in a weekend attack on a roadblock the separatists have blamed on pro-Kiev ultra-nationalists.

On Tuesday, a Ukrainian reconnaissance plane was hit by small-arms fire from the town, but the aircraft landed safely with none of its crew hurt.

Pro-Moscow insurgents in Slavyansk are holding two journalists, an American working for the company Vice News, Simon Ostrovksy, and a Ukrainian working for a pro-Kiev outlet, Irma Krat.

Slavyansk's local rebel leader Vyatcheslav Ponomarev told reporters that the American "is not being detained, was not abducted, has not been arrested" and claimed he was "working" in one of the rebel-occupied buildings.

However the Twitter feed of the normally prolific journalist has been inactive for a day.

- Lack of 'measurable progress' -

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, in an overnight call to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, "expressed deep concern over the lack of positive Russian steps to de-escalate, cited mounting evidence that separatists continue to increase the number of buildings under occupation and take journalists and other civilians captive," a senior State Department official said.

Kerry also warned that a lack of Russian progress on the Geneva deal struck last week would lead to more sanctions on Moscow.

Washington, like Kiev, believes Russian President Vladimir Putin is behind the Ukrainian rebellion in the east.

The State Department official said Kerry "reiterated that the absence of measurable progress on implementing the Geneva agreement will result in increased sanctions on Russia".

Those messages were underlined on a visit to Kiev on Tuesday by U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, who also stressed U.S. support for Ukraine's new leaders -- in power since the ouster in February of the pro-Kremlin president.

Biden called on Russia to pull back its forces from the border, and to reverse its annexation of the strategic Crimea peninsula last month.

The deepening of the crisis has given rise to a precarious Cold War-style standoff between Moscow and the West.

Russia has deployed tens of thousands of troops to Ukraine's eastern border, while the United States was sending 600 soldiers to NATO member countries near Ukraine to boost defences in eastern Europe.

A company of 150 troops will arrive in Poland on Wednesday and another 450 are due in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in the coming days.

The move sends a "message to Moscow" that "we take our obligations very, very seriously on the continent of Europe," U.S. Rear Admiral John Kirby told a news conference in Washington.

The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which has more than 150 monitors in the Ukraine, has also said it was worried about the increasing tensions.

Russia has dismissed the threat of new sanctions and insists that it has the right to protect the Russian-speaking population in Ukraine, a former Soviet republic.

But Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has acknowledged his nation's economy was facing an "unprecedented challenge" with recession looming.

 8 
 on: Today at 04:18 AM 
Started by cat777 - Last post by Skywalker
Hi Rad and group,

I had already started something on Neptune in transit but was/am still at an initial level, taking mental notes and putting some ideas together. I thought we would be doing our own interpretation of the current transit of Neptune through Pisces and how it is being experienced on a collective level and, what in our perspective it could correlate to for the future, the time frame that Neptune will be in Pisces. Rad then asked to tie it into a birth chart and I was going to do a comprehensive write up of how Neptune dynamics were being experienced by the collective and then also how it could be experienced in an individuals life by looking at the transit in a persons chart. I had not chosen any chart and didn´t understand Rad had decided to end the thread, so I just have some notes and ideas at this point in time.

Rad,

if you would like me/us to still work on the transit of Neptune in Pisces and how it is being experienced on a collective level and what it can potentially correlate to for the future, I´m up for it. Just let me know. I do personally think it´s interesting and can be of value to those who work on it and, for those who would read it, specially if it is to be published in book form. Astrologers and others who simply may be interested in the Neptune material will also be interested in the current transit of Neptune and what to expect on an evolutionary level for the  present and near future.

Whatever you decide is fine by me, it´s been a great journey either way!

All the best

 9 
 on: Today at 03:37 AM 
Started by ari moshe - Last post by Katherine
Hi Ari,
Thanks so much for your feedback.

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Paranoia is not specific to Aries just by itself. Paranoia as well as the depersonalization/objectification of other humans would be Aquarius/Uranus/11th house.

I am familiar with this correlation to Aquarius and I wasn't sure what word would best suit the feeling I was trying to describe and didn't want to just say intense fear because I felt that was too generic--it suggests so many types of experiences. I was double-dutching it because I wanted a word with the patina of isolation and gut awareness. In retrospect, paranoia is more heady and sketched out. Anxiety, panic, or alarm would have been more appropriate.

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What do you mean by "psychosomatic experience of involution"? I don't understand the intent of the use of involution in this context.

I will check my understanding of involution. Then get back to you on this.

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Wow great insight!

Not sure which part you were referring to but, I really wanted to get a sense of this signature. Drop in and feel the dynamic. And when I saw (at least to my capacity as a beginner) the SN-NN shift from Aries to Libra and the everything changed / nothing really changed  I was floored. It's a saturation threshold! When we em-body the lessons of the SN they become the tools and gifts that enable the NN to be actualized. (It's an exact opposition.)

And thank you for the examples within each evolutionary state, for taking the time. That was really helpful.

Much love, Ari.
God Bless,
Katherine

 10 
 on: Apr 22, 2014, 10:27 PM 
Started by cat777 - Last post by Kristin
Dear Rad and group,

Thank you for this invaluable learning experience. I too feel complete and am so pumped about this book for EA.

Peace,
Kristin

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