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 51 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:56 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Indian man forced to carry dead wife home after hospital 'refuses' transport

Anger after Dana Majhi walks 12km of a 60km trek home, claiming an Odisha hospital refused to transport her body
A screengrab of Dana Majhi carrying the body of his dead wife Amang toward their home in Melghara after a hospital allegedly refused to.

Michael Safi in Delhi
AFP
Friday 26 August 2016 07.43 BST

A villager in the east Indian state of Odisha carried his deceased wife 12km after the hospital where she died allegedly refused to transport her body back home.

Dana Majhi’s wife Amang died from tuberculosis on Tuesday at Bhawanipatna hospital, about 60km from their home in Melghara.

He was spotted by locals on Wednesday after trekking around 10km with his wife’s body wrapped in a sheet over his shoulder, walking beside his crying 12-year-old daughter Chaula.

Footage of the sorry scene was broadcast on Indian television and shared widely across social media, triggering an outcry and the launch of free transport scheme to return the dead to their homes for cremation.

Majhi, a daily wage labourer, told a local TV station the hospital had declined to return his 42-year-old wife’s body home and asked him repeatedly to move her himself.

“The hospital authorities said that there are no vehicles. I pleaded with them saying I am a poor person and cannot afford a vehicle to carry my wife’s body. Despite repeated requests, they said they cannot offer me any help,” Majhi said.

After being alerted that Majhi was walking home with her body, district officials arranged for an ambulance to drive the family the remaining 50km back to Melghara.

The local district administrator’s office investigated the matter and cleared the hospital on Friday, denying staff had refused to transport Amang’s body home. It claimed Majhi had taken her body without informing anyone or collecting her death certificate.

    — Baijayant Jay Panda (@PandaJay)
    August 25, 2016

    [1/2] Despite much progress in Odisha's health sector, y'day news of a man carrying his wife's body for more than 10km was awful. Meantime..

    — Baijayant Jay Panda (@PandaJay)
    August 25, 2016

    [2/2] A plan had been in the works, today CM @Naveen_Odisha launched "Mahaprayana" scheme w/12 hearses for dist hospitals. Will be expanded

It was one of several recent incidents highlighting the problem of transporting cadavers in a nation where more than 270 million people still live below the poverty line.

On Wednesday railway police were seen carrying the body of a 76-year-old woman who had been hit by a train in Soro, also in Odisha. “I saw the visuals of my mother being shifted like a dead animal. It was painful,” her son Rabindra said, according to the Times of India.

The same day in another part of the remote state, a family also reportedly dumped the body of a 45-year-old family member near a hospital to save the cost of transporting the man home.

The chief minister of Odisha, Naveen Patnaik, announced a policy in February to provide free transport home for the deceased relations of poor families. In response to the outcry over Majhi’s long walk home he formally launched the scheme on Thursday.

 52 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:53 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Czech tourist reveals how she survived 30-day ordeal in New Zealand mountains

Pavlina Pižova tells of enduring the death of her partner, sleeping three nights in the open and how attempts to walk back to safety were thwarted by poor weather and avalanches

Eleanor Ainge Roy
AFP
Friday 26 August 2016 04.14 BST

Pavlina Pižova, the Czech tourist who survived a month in the New Zealand wilderness, has told how she endured three nights in the open in freezing winter conditions before managing to find shelter at a mountain hut.

Pižova, 33, and her partner Ondrej Petr, 27, began hiking the famous Routeburn track in Fiordland National Park in the South Island on 26 July.

But two days after starting out in freezing mid-winter conditions the pair become lost and disoriented due to fog and heavy snow, she told a press conference in Queenstown on Friday, and wandered off the main track.

The couple spent one night in the open and the next day, according to Pižova, Petr slipped, fell down a steep slope and died shortly afterwards.

“The conditions were extreme, we encountered heavy snow fall and low cloud which contributed to our enforced overnighting in the open which affected our plans to reach Lake McKenzie Hut,” Pižova said at press conference dressed in hiking boots and hiking clothes.

“In our attempt to reach the hut the tragic accident happened when my partner fell and died,” she said.

Pižova then spent two more nights exposed to the elements, including heavy snow and below freezing conditions, as she struggled to find the hut which lies on the 32km track.

Pižova’s translator, Vladka Kennett, said she “did not understand” how Pizova survived without shelter but that Pizova had told her that she stuffed her sleeping bag with everything she had to stay warm and massaged her feet continuously.

“She is an extremely tough woman,” said Kennett, who is the Czech honorary consul in Queenstown.

After two nights in the open Pižova managed to find her way way to Lake Mackenzie Hut, a distance of 2km. Pižova said the short trip took so long because of poor visibility, exhaustion and her frozen feet.

She first explored the public 50-bed facility, before climbing through a window into the smaller warden’s hut , which was better supplied and more comfortable.

Pižova had food, firewood and gas to stay warm. There was also a mountain radio but Pižova was unable to understand the English instructions for operating it.

“At the hut, considering my physical health, the deep snow conditions, knowing there were avalanche paths ahead of me, I knew it was best to stay in the safe place,” said Pižova.

“I made a few attempts to walk out from the hut, but my feet, the weather conditions and the deep snow discouraged me from doing so. At the hut I saw numerous avalanches coming down.”

During her month-long stay at Lake Mackenzie Pižova attempted to fashion a pair of snow shoes from hiking poles and wood. She also drew an ‘H’ in the snow (for help), which she inked with ash from the fire, to try and attract the attention of helicopters flying overhead.

The pair had not told anyone about their hiking plans and it was almost a month before the Czech consulate finally raised the alarm. Police found the couple’s car at the trailhead on Wednesday and sent a helicopter along the route, reaching Pizova at 1.30pm.

Police said she was “relieved” to be rescued and was found to be in remarkably good health, considering her ordeal. Pižova called the people involved in her rescue “heroes”.

At the press conference, Pižova was asked about the effect of recent media speculation and comments by mountain experts that her remarkable story of survival was “unbelievable” and “odd”.

Kennett responded that Pižova was ignoring the reports and rising above any local gossip. “She is such a brave person and she is ignoring it,” said Kennett.

The New Zealand police said any commentary around Pizova’s decision and what happened on the Routeburn track was “unhelpful.”.

Pižova has been in touch with her family and hopes to return home as soon as possible. Although she remained stoic through most of the press conference, towards the end she began to cry softly as she thanked the New Zealand police, search and rescue and her translator for their help.

Pižova encouraged other tourists to make sure they told someone they trusted about their hiking plans, carry an emergency locator beacon and not to underestimate the New Zealand weather.

A body believed to be that of Ondrej Petr was retrieved from the area by police on Friday and a coronial inquiry into the death has been launched.

Inspector Olaf Jensen, Otago Lakes Central police area commander, reiterated that Pižova made the right decision to stay put in the hut.

 53 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:49 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
British public back strong new wildlife laws post-Brexit, YouGov poll shows

Majority of British public polled support protections at least as strong as current EU rules and many think farming subsidies should focus more on environmental protection

Damian Carrington
AFP
Thursday 25 August 2016 11.48 BST

An overwhelming majority of the British public polled want new post-Brexit laws protecting wildlife and the countryside to be at least as strong as the EU rules currently in place, according to a opinion poll published on Thursday.

Many also want a new farming subsidy regime to emphasise environmental protection more than the EU’s existing Common Agricultural Policy and the vast majority want an EU ban on neonicotinoid pesticides, known to harm bees and other pollinators, to remain in place.

Much of the protection of British wildlife and the environment stems from EU’s birds and habitat directives, but these will have to be replaced when the UK leaves the bloc. Farming minister George Eustice campaigned for the UK to leave the EU and told the Guardian in May that these directives were “spirit crushing” and “would go”.

But the national poll, conducted by YouGov for Friends of the Earth, found that support for the same or better environmental protection was high even among those who voted to leave the EU.

Overall, 83% of people said Britain should pass new laws providing better (46%) or the same (37%) protection for wild areas and wildlife as current EU laws, with only 4% wanting lower protection. Of those who voted to leave, 46% wanted better protection, 39% the same and 6% less protection.

The poll found 88% of people wanted the neonicotinoid ban to stay in place after the UK leaves the EU, with just 5% wanting the ban to be scrapped. The National Farmers Union (NFU) opposes the ban, arguing that it blocks useful protection of oil seed rape crops, but the ministers recently rejected an NFU application for an “emergency” lifting of the ban.

EU farming subsidies are currently worth £3bn a year to UK farmers and include some schemes for improving the environment. The poll showed 57% of the public want more emphasis (25%) or the same emphasis (32%) on environmental protection. Only 7% of people wanted less emphasis on environmental protection, while 11% said there should be no subsidies at all.

Chancellor Philip Hammond said earlier in August that existing levels of farm subsidies will be guaranteed until 2020, when there will be a “transition to new domestic arrangements”. The National Trust, a major landowner, recently called for complete reform of the British farm subsidy system after Brexit, ending payments for simply owning land and only rewarding farmers who improve the environment and help wildlife. The NFU criticised the plan, saying food production is vital.

Samuel Lowe, at Friends of the Earth, said: “This [poll] sends a powerful message to the UK government that EU rules aimed at protecting our natural environment must be maintained or strengthened. The poll completely undermines those who argue that Brexit should lead to a watering down of the UK’s environmental commitments.”

He said: “The government must also stand up to pressure from the NFU and keep the EU ban on bee-harming neonicotinoid pesticides. This is what the science says, and the public demands.”

 54 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:47 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Obama to create world's largest protected marine area off Hawaii

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to be expanded to more than twice the size of Texas
A Hawaiian Pigfish in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Associated Press in Washington
Friday 26 August 2016 09.46 BST

Barack Obama is to create the world’s largest protected marine area off the coast of Hawaii, the White House has said.

The president’s proclamation will quadruple the size of a protected area originally designated by his predecessor, George Bush, in 2006. The expanded Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument will cover around 582,578 sq miles (1.5m sq km), more than twice the size of Texas.

Obama will travel to Hawaii next week to mark the designation and cite the need to protect public lands and waters from climate change.

The designation bans commercial fishing and any new mining, as is the case within the existing area. Recreational fishing will be allowed with a permit, as will scientific research and the removal of fish and other resources for native Hawaiian cultural practices.

Some fishing groups have said they are concerned about the affect of the expansion on their industry. Sean Martin, the president of the Hawaii Longline Association, said he was disappointed by the decision of Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, to support the move, claiming it was based on political, not scientific reasons.

Hawaii’s longline fishing fleet supplies a large portion of the fresh tuna and other fish consumed in Hawaii. Martin has previously estimated the fleet catches about 2m lbs (900,000kg) of fish annually from the proposed expansion area.

The White House said the expansion would help protect more than 7,000 species and improve the resilience of an ecosystem dealing with ocean acidification and warming. A fact sheet previewing the announcement states that the expanded area is considered a sacred place for native Hawaiians.

Shipwrecks and downed aircraft from the Battle of Midway in the second world war dot the expansion area. The battle marked a major shift in the war. Obama will travel to the Midway atoll to discuss the expansion.

With this decision, Obama will have created or expanded 26 US national monuments. The administration said Obama had protected more acreage through national monument designations than any other president.

The White House said the expansion was a response to a proposal from the Democratic senator Brian Schatz and prominent native Hawaiian leaders.

 55 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:46 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Obama to create world's largest protected marine area off Hawaii

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to be expanded to more than twice the size of Texas
A Hawaiian Pigfish in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Associated Press in Washington
Friday 26 August 2016 09.46 BST

Barack Obama is to create the world’s largest protected marine area off the coast of Hawaii, the White House has said.

The president’s proclamation will quadruple the size of a protected area originally designated by his predecessor, George Bush, in 2006. The expanded Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument will cover around 582,578 sq miles (1.5m sq km), more than twice the size of Texas.

Obama will travel to Hawaii next week to mark the designation and cite the need to protect public lands and waters from climate change.

The designation bans commercial fishing and any new mining, as is the case within the existing area. Recreational fishing will be allowed with a permit, as will scientific research and the removal of fish and other resources for native Hawaiian cultural practices.

Some fishing groups have said they are concerned about the affect of the expansion on their industry. Sean Martin, the president of the Hawaii Longline Association, said he was disappointed by the decision of Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, to support the move, claiming it was based on political, not scientific reasons.

Hawaii’s longline fishing fleet supplies a large portion of the fresh tuna and other fish consumed in Hawaii. Martin has previously estimated the fleet catches about 2m lbs (900,000kg) of fish annually from the proposed expansion area.

The White House said the expansion would help protect more than 7,000 species and improve the resilience of an ecosystem dealing with ocean acidification and warming. A fact sheet previewing the announcement states that the expanded area is considered a sacred place for native Hawaiians.

Shipwrecks and downed aircraft from the Battle of Midway in the second world war dot the expansion area. The battle marked a major shift in the war. Obama will travel to the Midway atoll to discuss the expansion.

With this decision, Obama will have created or expanded 26 US national monuments. The administration said Obama had protected more acreage through national monument designations than any other president.

The White House said the expansion was a response to a proposal from the Democratic senator Brian Schatz and prominent native Hawaiian leaders.

 56 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:44 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
England's best-loved wildlife still in serious decline, report shows

Government countryside assessment paints a ‘grim picture’ with key species such as hedgehogs, dormice, birds and butterflies all continuing to decrease in number

Damian Carrington
@dpcarrington

Friday 26 August 2016 11.12 BST
Last modified on Friday 26 August 2016 11.38 BST   

Much of England’s best-loved wildlife remains in serious decline, according to the latest official assessment from the government. Birds and butterflies on farmland have continued their long term downward trend and 75% of over 200 “priority” species across the country – including hedgehogs, dormice and moths – are falling in number.

The Natural Environment Indicators for England also showed that water quality has fallen in the last five years, with just one in five rivers and lakes having high or good status, and the amount of time given by conservation volunteers has also fallen.

However, the sustainability of fisheries has improved, as has the amount of carbon locked up in forests and litter in the seas has begun to decline. The indicators were established by the government’s Natural Environment white paper in 2011, which said it would “put right damage done in previous years” by placing “the value of nature at the centre of the choices our nation must make”.
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“This report paints a pretty grim picture of how our wildlife is faring in the countryside,” said Sandra Bell, at Friends of the Earth. “Added to recent new evidence that wild bees have been harmed by neonicotinoid pesticides, it’s clear that if we want to enjoy a thriving natural environment big changes are needed to our farming system. This must be a priority for the government as part of its Brexit strategy.”

Christopher Price, at the CLA, which represents landowners, farmers and rural businesses, said: “This progress report is a tough read for all those who care about our countryside. As we prepare to exit the EU, it is clear that the new [farming and environment] policy must have greater ambition in how it supports farmers and land managers to deliver better environmental outcomes.” On Thursday, a poll showed the public strongly supports stronger post-Brexit environmental policies.

A spokesman for the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which published the new report, said: “We have some of the most fantastic wildlife in the world and we are determined to protect our excellent natural resources.”

“We are making good progress – over 100,000 hectares of habitat created or restored, targeted conservation increasing populations of once very scarce species, such as the cirl bunting, and schoolchildren helping to plant at least 10m new trees by the end of this parliament,” the spokesman said. “Although we have seen many clear successes, government cannot create a better natural environment alone – that is why we are working with businesses, farmers, land managers, and communities to achieve our shared ambition of better protecting our precious wildlife.”

Over the last five years, six of the 24 key indicators assessed were deteriorating and 10 showed little or no change, while eight were improving. Eighteen of the indicators were assessed over the longer term, 10 years or more, with seven deteriorating, 3 showing little or no change and eight improving.

Farmland birds fell to the second lowest level ever recorded in 2014, the most recent year for which data was available, 56% lower than in 1970. Farmland butterflies reached their lowest point in 2012 and small increases in the next two years did not significantly alter the overall downward trend. Wintering water birds have also declined in the last five years.

Christine Reid, at the Woodland Trust, said: “It’s hard to be positive about the state of our wildlife when reading these figures, which is why we need government to deliver a 25-year plan for the environment which can truly enable positive change.” A comprehensive 25-year plan for the environment due to be published by the end of 2016 has been postponed by the Brexit vote.

Reid said: “It’s about people power too. We saw the reaction when our public forests were at risk of being sold off – people care about the environment – but it can take the threat of loss to motivate. So make a change now; create a wildlife habitat, help preserve a local conservation area or campaign for ancient woodland.”

 57 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:43 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Indonesia seizes hundreds of frozen pangolins

Authorities find more than 650 critically endangered pangolins hidden in freezers in Java
Pangolins seized in East Java, Indonesia

Agence France-Presse
Friday 26 August 2016 10.44 BST
   
Indonesian authorities have seized more than 650 critically endangered pangolins found hidden in freezers and arrested a man for allegedly breaking wildlife protection laws, police said on Friday.

Police discovered the pangolins, known as “scaly anteaters”, when they raided a house in Jombang district on the main island of Java after local residents became suspicious about the large number of freezers in the property.

A total of 657 pangolins, which are consumed as a luxury dish in China and used in traditional medicine, were found wrapped in plastic and stored in five large freezers, East Java province police spokesman Raden Prabowo Argo Yuwono told AFP.

The house owner, a 55-year-old man whose identity was not disclosed, was arrested and has been named a suspect, a step in the Indonesian legal system meaning that authorities believe they have enough evidence to consider filing charges.

He could face five years in prison and a fine of 100m rupiah ($7,500) for breaking wildlife protection laws.

“The suspect insisted the Pangolins were not his, a friend asked him to store the animals because he has freezers,” Yuwono said, adding the friend named by the suspect was also being sought.

The suspect, who was arrested during the police raid on 15 August, insisted he had not sold any of the pangolins and refused to tell police where they were to be sent, the spokesman said.

Pangolins are sought after in China and other parts of Asia for their meat, skin and scales. The meat is considered a delicacy, while the skin and scales are used in traditional medicine and to make fashion items such as make boots and shoes.

Protection group the International Union for Conservation of Nature classifies the pangolin species found in Indonesia as critically endangered.

 58 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:40 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Young rabbit considers us as a threat

Wenlock Edge The rabbit we watched watching us was taking its sentry duty seriously, and had the makings of a dominant adult – if it survived long enough

Paul Evans
AFP
Wednesday 24 August 2016 05.30 BST

All ear and eye, the rabbit was as alert as an exclamation mark. It remained still and watchful, as if it thought it was invisible when in fact its attention was so intense it seemed as obvious as a warning beacon in an otherwise languid August afternoon.

The young rabbit was assessing the distance of this particular threat – two people and a dog – the distance to the burrow in the hedge, an escape route across the field, the position of the other rabbits, other potential threats from land and sky.

It was mapping all this through sight, sound and smell: a three-, perhaps four-dimensional landscape in which an additional rabbit-sense – a prey species instinct for survival, developed over millennia – shaped its existence in the world.

Originating in the Iberian peninsula, Oryctolagus cuniculus – hare-like digger of underground tunnels – was domesticated by the Romans, brought to Britain by the Normans and farmed for centuries in extensive warrens.

Around the 18th century, when people began to see the countryside here as an intimate, bucolic scene of picturesque beauty, rabbits were let loose into it – and into new Europes constructed by colonists in various parts of the world. Guns, snares, traps, dogs, disease – these were the rewards for rabbit success.

Coneys – the name for adult rabets – were meat for humans. Today few people eat them and predators that were once persecuted as vermin for trying to take them now can.

Weasels, stoats, polecats, buzzards, foxes and badgers all like a bit of rabbit, and many more species survive on their remains and the gardening effects of their grazing. Without rabbits there would be even less wildlife in this sanitised, over-managed, picturesque idyll.

What, then, is rabbit-world like? The one we watched watching us was already part of a complex society with hierarchies, territories, shared responsibilities and individual lives. It was taking its sentry duty seriously, protecting its community, and had the makings of a dominant adult – if it survived long enough. What it would do in the next 10 seconds could well determine that fate.

******************

A baby rabbit with a long pedigree

Claxton, Norfolk The cony, as it was originally called, was probably introduced by the Plantagenets

AFP
Tuesday 29 March 2016 05.30 BST

A large grey fur ball bustles suddenly by the path and then stares up with soft black eyes. It shows more curiosity than fear, suggesting this is the first time in its short life that it has met my kind. Certainly it is my first baby rabbit of the spring.

You might think that the widespread emergence of these adorable creatures at this season lies behind the tradition of the Easter bunny but, in fact, the two are completely unrelated. The association between the passion of Christ and the festive lagomorph actually originates with the hare.

Yet this little rabbit is still steeped in history. The sandy bank in which it was probably born, as well as the adjacent field and the row of houses along its southern boundary, are all known as “The Warren”. Warren View Cottage, on the opposite side of the street, is at least 300 years old. All the names hint at the long tradition of rabbit cultivation in our village.

The cony, as it was originally called, and pronounced like honey, from the Latin cuniculus, was probably introduced by the Plantagenets, with the first mention of homegrown stock in 1235. Henry III was heaping about 450 conies onto his groaning Christmas table by 1251, yet this is modest in comparison with the glutton’s party thrown at Archbishop Neville’s York enthronement (1465) where 4,000 rabbits were consumed.

A single major warren, such as the one at Thetford in south Norfolk, could yield 20,000-30,000 a year and reflected the importance of both the sweet, rather bird-like, pink flesh and the soft fur. There was a fur-processing factory in Breckland until the 1970s but things quickly changed with the arrival of the myxoma virus. This South-American-sourced plague was as devastating to our appetites for rabbit products as it was to the animals themselves. By 1959 British numbers had fallen by an estimated 99%, to just 1m. Resistance to various viruses means that rabbit numbers are now more stable, but the fur bundle at my feet has about a one in three chance of succumbing to the next outbreak.

 59 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:37 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Kingfisher bonds will loosen as summer fades

Airedale, West Yorkshire By early September mating instincts will give way to a territorial urge and this stretch of river won’t be big enough for both birds

Richard Smyth
AFP
Friday 26 August 2016 05.30 BST   

They’re still together, but it won’t last. The sycamore keys have started to twirl to earth and a parting of ways is on the cards. Kingfisher pairs seldom outlast the summer; by early September mating instincts will have given way to the territorial urge, and that’ll mean that this stretch of the river won’t be big enough for the both of them.

It’s warm, a bit muggy, and the air is thick with the musty stink of rosebay willowherb. Mallard drakes in their dowdy moult or “eclipse” plumage lounge in sulky gangs on the gravel spit, exiled dukes stripped of their finery.

Ants launch pell-mell into flight from a riverbank nest. The female kingfisher – close enough for me to see, by the vermilion-red on the lower part of her bill, that she is the female – zigzags the river, from a clump of reed to a low-hanging beech to a thicket of tired rosebay, where I lose sight of her.

Then along comes the male, taking a smart racing line down the middle of the river. Kingfishers, like movie stars, are always smaller than you expect.

With a noise like ripping linen, a flock of nine young goosanders – “redheads” – drops from the sky. They form a loose flotilla on the water. I last saw some of these as ducklings, back in the late spring, jockeying for places on their mother’s back. Now they’re fine looking adolescents, their long bodies as smooth and silver as river fish. One snaps a saw-edged bill at another.

Both goosander and kingfisher have been vilified in the past for their supposed impact on freshwater fish stocks. Not long ago, I’m told, the warden at the reserve here pointed out the kingfisher pair to a new visitor. “Yes, I see,” the visitor said. “Do you shoot them?”

The female in the rosebay gives her call, somewhere between a whistle and a chirrup. She won’t go far once autumn comes, just a little further upriver.

Over my head a jay takes flight from the sycamore. As the bird crosses the river to the meadow and hawthorns beyond it looks heavy winged and exhausted. But jays in flight always look exhausted.

Jonathan Elphick gives this year’s William Condry memorial lecture (thecondrylecture.co.uk) on The Birds of North Wales at Tabernacle/MoMA, Machynlleth, 1 October, 7pm for 7.30. Admission £5 to include refreshments (no need to book)

 60 
 on: Aug 26, 2016, 05:35 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Baby orangutan in Borneo has bullet removed from shoulder – video

Guardian
8/26/2016

A baby orangutan in Borneo called Didik undergoes surgery to have a bullet removed from his shoulder. The little ape has been in the care of the International Animal Rescue orangutan centre in Indonesia since June, and was found traumatised and in poor physical condition. Vets are now hoping Didik will continue to go from strength to strength and soon be ready to start his lengthy rehabilitation by meeting other baby orangutans in the centre’s pre-school

Click to watch: https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2016/aug/25/baby-orangutan-didik-borneo-surgery-bullet-removed-shoulder-video

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