Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
 91 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:18 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
Families living in poverty in the shadow of Azerbaijan's luxury sports stadiums

As authorities invest heavily in hosting European Games, residents ask who will benefit from the event. Meydan TV report

Aytac Tapdıq and Sevinc Vaqifqızı for Meydan TV, part of the New East network
Wednesday 20 May 2015 05.00 BST

Gulnara Suleymanova and her family of five live in a wagon behind Baku’s prestigious new sports stadium, built especially for next month’s European Games.

“On your way here, you might have seen piles of sand, that’s where my husband sieves when there’s no work,” says Suleymanova, who is a cleaner.

The family’s income is about 300 Azerbaijani manats (£184) a month – which is barely enough for food, she says.

Theirs is the story of a family subsisting alongside the ambitious venues constructed for Azerbaijan’s inaugural Games and generously funded by the state oil company Socar. The authoritarian president, Ilham Alyev, a keen enthusiast of the Games, is said to have invested a total of £6.5bn in sports venues and infrastructure.

Organisers are also paying the travel and accommodation expenses of all 6,000 athletes competing in the event, a move condemned by human rights groups as an attempt to whitewash the country’s poor human rights record and endemic corruption.

Last week the government extended the detention of award-winning investigative journalist who had written articles exposing state corruption.

Life in the oilfields

For Suleymanova, the glaring disparity between the luxury stadiums and her family’s daily struggle raises important questions about who the Games will actually benefit.

“It’s cold in the winter, and it doesn’t matter how much you use the heater,” Suleymanova says. “In the summer, it’s terribly hot. We take water from the neighbour. Water, gas, electricity are all one big problem. When it comes to living, you have to experience it yourself in order to understand. It’s hard to describe.”

After 10 years of renting, the family settled in their oilfield wagon behind the stadium. The smell of oil is ubiquitous, but it’s not their biggest problem: they are hungry, thirsty and the health of two of her children is deteriorating.

Suleymanova’s son has a hearing impairment and her daughter has problems with her vision. Each time she sees the stadium she wonders how many children could access medical treatment with the money it cost to build.

“Only 100th of those four billion manats would be enough to treat my child,” she says. “But they didn’t give it to me. Wherever I went, I got nothing.”

‘Everything I have is inside this room’

Suleymanova’s family live in one dim, narrow, room scant with furniture.

“I don’t have a table. I can’t offer you a chair, because I don’t have it,” Suleymanova says. “This is both my living room and bedroom. I don’t have proper curtains. If you ask for a bathroom, we don’t have it either, we shower at the neighbours’ place.”

“I don’t have a kitchen. Everything I have is inside this room,” she adds.

Her requests for government help have fallen on deaf ears. She applied for targeted social assistance but didn’t qualify. “They told me your husband must have a job in a state-funded entity. You need to bring a paper proving that. If I had a job in a public company why would I ever need your social assistance?” she asks.

Turning black gold into sporting glitter: what Azerbaijan tells us about modern sport... Read more..http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/dec/19/black-gold-sporting-glitter-azerbaijan-modern-sport

“They build sports complexes, construct roads, but who benefits from them? Why don’t they help children? Why don’t they think that there are small children, sick and poor people living in this country? Why don’t they help them?” she asks.

Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIVpeWdtLuI&hd=1

 92 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:12 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Japanese aquariums vote to stop buying Taiji dolphins

Aquariums promise to stop acquiring live cetaceans from controversy-hit town amid threat of ejection from leading zoo organisation

Justin McCurry in Tokyo
Wednesday 20 May 2015 12.33 BST
Guardian

Aquariums in Japan have voted to stop buying live dolphins from the town of Taiji, where the annual slaughter of hundreds of cetaceans has drawn widespread condemnation, after being threatened with expulsion from the world’s leading zoo organisation.

The Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums (Jaza) voted to stay part of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (Waza) on Wednesday, a move that in effect ends the procurement of Taiji dolphins by aquariums and sea parks in Japan.

The decision comes weeks after Waza suspended its Japanese members and threatened them with expulsion unless they ended their “unethical” association with the town.

Taiji, in Wakayama prefecture on the Pacific coast, gained notoriety in the Oscar-winning 2009 documentary The Cove, which showed fishermen herding pods of dolphins into shallow water before killing them with knives.

Most of the animals captured during the drive hunts are butchered for their meat, but some are sold to aquariums and sea parks in Japan and overseas.

A majority of the 89 zoos and 63 aquariums belonging to Jaza voted to remain in the global zoo organisation, Japanese media reported.

Voting to retain their commercial ties to Taiji would have led to expulsion and threatened their ability to acquire rare animal species from zoos and aquariums overseas through a global database.

Swiss-based Waza suspended its Japanese members on 22 April after they ignored requests to stop acquiring Taiji dolphins, almost all of them bottlenoses.

The suspension came soon after the Guardian revealed that Waza had been targeted in a court action launched by Australia for Dolphins. The group accused it of being complicit in the infamous hunts by failing to take decisive action against Japanese aquariums.

Australia for Dolphins described Wednesday’s vote as “the beginning of the end of dolphin hunting”. “We are absolutely delighted to hear Japan’s peak zoo body has voted to uphold international animal welfare standards and stop purchasing Taiji dolphins,” Sarah Lucas, the chief executive, said.

“This momentous decision marks the beginning of the end for dolphin hunting in Japan. The capture of live dolphins, which sell for up to $100,000, is the motivation for the brutal dolphin hunts in Taiji. This decision, which stops Japanese aquariums demanding more Taiji dolphins, is a huge blow to the hunts.

“Jaza aquariums provide up to 40 percent of total demand for live dolphins from Taiji. So, as of today, the market for Taiji dolphins could be nearly cut in half. Without demand, the hunts won’t continue. It is the first major step towards ending the Taiji dolphin hunts once and for all.”

Lucas said the group would continue its legal action against Waza because other members of the organisation continue to buy dolphins from Taiji and other inhumane hunts. At least 18 of the 33 aquariums in Japan that keep dolphins obtained the animals from drive hunts, according to the Yomiuri Shimbun.

Jaza officials said they would concentrate on expanding domestic breeding programmes in an attempt to make up for the expected shortfall in the supply of dolphins, a huge attraction at the country’s many aquariums and sea parks.

Before the vote, the governor of Wakayama prefecture, Yoshinobu Nisaka, said the threat of expulsion amounted to “bullying from all over the world”.

Yoshihide Suga, the chief cabinet secretary, defended the Taiji hunts, describing them as “a sustainable fishing [method] under appropriate control by the government with scientific foundations, and carried out carefully so that dolphins are not hurt”.

The capture of dolphins is said to have doubled in the past 10 years. A fully trained dolphin on public display can be worth more than $100,000 (£62,000), compared with as little as $100 if butchered for meat. Anti-hunt campaigners say the market for captured dolphins in China is growing rapidly.

Over the past five years, observers say, more than 5,000 dolphins have been killed at Taiji, with a further 750 captured for aquariums.

 93 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:09 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
EU Parliament Lifts Immunity for Sarkozy Aide

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 16:51

The European Parliament on Tuesday lifted the immunity of a French lawmaker wanted for questioning by judges over a scandal relating to the funding of former president Nicolas Sarkozy's 2012 presidential campaign.

In an overwhelming majority show of hands, the parliament in Strasbourg, France responded to the request of the French judges and lifted the immunity of Jerome Lavrilleux, the former deputy director of Sarkozy's campaign.

"I myself voted to have my immunity lifted. I had said since last May that I would not hide behind my immunity to shirk my responsibilities," Lavrilleux told reporters.

"I'm available to answer all questions the judges would like to ask," he added.

French judges are investigating PR firm Bygmalion, which is accused of falsifying invoices for staging Sarkozy events, billing the conservative UMP party instead of the Sarkozy campaign.

The alleged fraud was supposedly carried out to circumvent strict caps on campaign spending.

Lavrilleux dropped the bombshell in May last year that campaign spending was passed off as party conferences through sham invoices.

He has said that neither Sarkozy nor then UMP chief Jean-Francois Cope knew of the scheme.

However, caught up in the scandal, Cope later resigned from the party leadership.

Last November Sarkozy was elected UMP leader despite his legal woes.

Although undeclared, Sarkozy is on the hunt to grab back the keys of the Elysee Palace from the man who beat him in 2012, the now deeply unpopular Socialist President Francois Hollande.

Source: Agence France Presse

 94 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:08 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
NATO Urges Russia to be More 'Transparent' on Military Exercises

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 17:42

NATO head Jens Stoltenberg urged Russia on Tuesday for full transparency during snap military exercises in order to avoid potentially catastrophic misunderstandings as the Ukraine crisis stokes tensions.

Transparency is paramount, Stoltenberg said after talks with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on the sidelines of a Council of Europe meeting in Brussels.

"For NATO it is important to do whatever we can to avoid that the incidents and the situation is spiraling out of control," he said.

"The snap exercises, the numbers ... reduce predictability and transparency along our borders and I think we should try to change that by the Russians being more transparent when it comes to their military activities."

NATO was "fully transparent when it comes to when and where we are going to conduct exercises," he added.

Stoltenberg's meeting with Lavrov was their first since early February and comes amid signs that tensions over Ukraine may be easing slightly although a tenuous ceasefire between Kiev forces and pro-Russian rebels continues to be breached daily.

Stoltenberg said they had discussed the "very serious situation in eastern Ukraine" and repeated that Moscow must do its part to ensure full implementation of the Minsk ceasefire accords, including withdrawal of heavy weapons and full access for OSCE monitors.

Russia should also "withdraw all its troops and support for the separatists," he added.

Moscow rejects claims that its troops are directly involved in a conflict which has cost more than 6,100 lives since April last year but makes clear it backs the rebels in eastern Ukraine.

NATO cut all practical cooperation with Russia that month after Moscow annexed Crimea, but Stoltenberg stressed that the U.S.-led military alliance kept its lines of communication open.

"It is important to have these lines of communication and they can contribute to more predictability and avoiding any misunderstandings."

"We are keeping the lines of political contact open and we will continue to do so," he added.

Source: Agence France Presse

 95 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:07 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
Hollande Rejects EU Migrant Quotas but Backs Better 'Distribution'

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 17:45

French President Francois Hollande said Tuesday that quotas for migrants in Europe were "out of the question" but said he supported a better distribution of refugees between EU countries.

"It's out of the question to have immigrant quotas because we have rules" on border checks and policies for overseeing immigration, Hollande said at a joint press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

"People who come because they think that Europe is a prosperous continent, even when they are not hired by companies... must be escorted back, that's the rule," Hollande told reporters.

"So one cannot talk of quotas, there can't be quotas for these migrants," he said, adding that quotas for  "the right to asylum" would not make sense.

However, with refugees arriving in great numbers in certain countries, Hollande said, citing Germany, France or Sweden, "we must ensure that other countries can also play their part.

"This is what we call distribution," Hollande said.

Merkel said she and Hollande had each asked their interior ministers to "reflect" on proposals by the European Commission.

"There are many questions that deserve examination," she told reporters.

These include how to deal with people who don't have the possibility of asking for political asylum.

"I am sure that on that we will have a Franco-German position soon," she said.

An action plan presented by the European Commission on asylum and immigration foresees binding quotas to ensure the burden of taking in refugees is fairly shared out, and in a crisis, the transfer of asylum-seekers between EU member states.

Source: Agence France Presse

 96 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:05 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Russian Parliament Passes Bill on 'Undesirable' Foreign NGOs

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 17:51

Russian lawmakers on Tuesday passed a controversial bill allowing authorities to ban foreign NGOs deemed "undesirable" for the state, the latest step in a crackdown condemned by rights activists.

Pro-Kremlin legislators overwhelmingly approved the legislation -- which still has to be voted on by the rubberstamp upper chamber and signed off by President Vladimir Putin -- that targets international non-governmental organizations accused of undermining Russia's "state security."

The law, opposed by the Kremlin's own human rights ombudsman, allows authorities to bar foreign civil society groups seen as threatening Russia's "defense capabilities" or "constitutional foundations" and go after local activists working with them.

Russian citizens who cooperate with the banned organizations can be hit by large fines and jailed for up to six years.

Rights groups have roundly condemned the legislation, with Amnesty International calling it "the latest chapter in an unprecedented crackdown against non-governmental organizations" aimed at stifling free speech in Russia.

Critics have also said that the vague wording of the law -- which gives Russia's general prosecutor the right to impose the "undesirable" tag without going to court -- could allow officials to target foreign businesses working in Russia.

Russian authorities have launched a sustained campaign to curb civil society since Vladimir Putin won his third term as president amid public protests in 2012. 

Russia passed legislation that year forcing local non-governmental organizations that receive overseas funding to register as "foreign agents", a loaded term activists say is aimed at halting their work.

Scores of organizations, from environmental campaign groups to gay rights activists, have already been targeted in the clampdown.

Lawmaker Alexander Tarnavsky, one of the authors of the bill, told AFP that the legislation was in retaliation for Western sanctions slapped on Russian firms over the Ukraine crisis.

"Just as there are Russian firms that are undesirable in Europe and the United States, so Russia has decided that it can also say that some American or European companies are undesirable on Russian territory," Tarnavsky said.

Moscow has become increasingly isolationist since the start of the Ukraine crisis, which saw Russia seize the Crimea peninsula and allegedly mastermind a separatist conflict after the ouster of a Kremlin-backed president in Ukraine.

Strongman Putin has portrayed the upheaval in Kiev as part of a U.S.-backed conspiracy to curb Russia. Lawmakers claim the "undesirable" organization bill is designed to stop a Western-instigated revolution against the Kremlin.

Critics of Putin, however, say the former KGB agent is using allegations of foreign meddling to tighten his grip on power and allow a small elite of corrupt cronies around him to massively enrich themselves.

Source: Agence France Presse

 97 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:04 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
Poison Chemical Found on Russian who Died in UK

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 18:21

A chemical linked to a rare poison was found in the body of a wealthy Russian businessman who died suddenly in Britain three years ago, a newspaper report said Tuesday.

Alexander Perepilichny was helping an investigation into an alleged money laundering scheme involving Russian tax officials at the time of his death, The Times added.

The 44-year-old collapsed outside his mansion on a luxury private estate on the outskirts of Weybridge in Surrey, near London, on November 10, 2012.

Bob Moxon Browne, a lawyer for Perepilichny's life insurance company, told a pre-inquest hearing into the death that test results had revealed a chemical that could be traced to the poison Gelsemium, The Times reported.

"Once you have knocked out man-made analogues then you are bound to conclude Mr Perepilichny ingested Gelsemium on the day of his death," the lawyer said.

"Then, given that it only grows in China and is a known weapon of assassination by Chinese and Russian contract killers, why was it in his stomach?"

Contacted by AFP, the lawyer and the Surrey coroner leading the inquest declined to comment.

A spokeswoman for the Royal Botanic Gardens in London told AFP the institution "has supplied its expertise in plant chemistry to assist the coroner's inquest".

But she declined to comment further "due to the sensitive nature of this work" until the inquest is completed, as expected later this year.

Gelsemium elegans is the most toxic variety of the gelsemium plant and only grows in Asia.

It is also known as "heartbreak grass" and early symptoms of ingestion include dizziness, nausea and convulsions.

Higher doses can cause paralysis of the spinal cord, a loss of muscular power and eventually asphyxia.

According to British press reports at the time of his death, Perepilichny was providing evidence on the death of anti-corruption lawyer Sergei Magnitsky in a Russian jail in 2009.

Magnitsky died at the age of 37 after being held in a notoriously squalid Russian prison during a fraud probe against his client, US investment firm Hermitage Capital.

Before he was detained, the lawyer claimed to have uncovered a scheme used by police officials to reclaim about $235 million in taxes paid by Hermitage Capital, once Russia's largest Western investment fund.

But instead officials charged Magnitsky with fraud and put him in jail.

Source: Agence France Presse

*************

Russian Parliament Passes Bill on 'Undesirable' Foreign NGOs

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 17:51

Russian lawmakers on Tuesday passed a controversial bill allowing authorities to ban foreign NGOs deemed "undesirable" for the state, the latest step in a crackdown condemned by rights activists.

Pro-Kremlin legislators overwhelmingly approved the legislation -- which still has to be voted on by the rubberstamp upper chamber and signed off by President Vladimir Putin -- that targets international non-governmental organizations accused of undermining Russia's "state security."

The law, opposed by the Kremlin's own human rights ombudsman, allows authorities to bar foreign civil society groups seen as threatening Russia's "defense capabilities" or "constitutional foundations" and go after local activists working with them.

Russian citizens who cooperate with the banned organizations can be hit by large fines and jailed for up to six years.

Rights groups have roundly condemned the legislation, with Amnesty International calling it "the latest chapter in an unprecedented crackdown against non-governmental organizations" aimed at stifling free speech in Russia.

Critics have also said that the vague wording of the law -- which gives Russia's general prosecutor the right to impose the "undesirable" tag without going to court -- could allow officials to target foreign businesses working in Russia.

Russian authorities have launched a sustained campaign to curb civil society since Vladimir Putin won his third term as president amid public protests in 2012. 

Russia passed legislation that year forcing local non-governmental organizations that receive overseas funding to register as "foreign agents", a loaded term activists say is aimed at halting their work.

Scores of organizations, from environmental campaign groups to gay rights activists, have already been targeted in the clampdown.

Lawmaker Alexander Tarnavsky, one of the authors of the bill, told AFP that the legislation was in retaliation for Western sanctions slapped on Russian firms over the Ukraine crisis.

"Just as there are Russian firms that are undesirable in Europe and the United States, so Russia has decided that it can also say that some American or European companies are undesirable on Russian territory," Tarnavsky said.

Moscow has become increasingly isolationist since the start of the Ukraine crisis, which saw Russia seize the Crimea peninsula and allegedly mastermind a separatist conflict after the ouster of a Kremlin-backed president in Ukraine.

Strongman Putin has portrayed the upheaval in Kiev as part of a U.S.-backed conspiracy to curb Russia. Lawmakers claim the "undesirable" organization bill is designed to stop a Western-instigated revolution against the Kremlin.

Critics of Putin, however, say the former KGB agent is using allegations of foreign meddling to tighten his grip on power and allow a small elite of corrupt cronies around him to massively enrich themselves.

Source: Agence France Presse

 98 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:03 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Poison Chemical Found on Russian who Died in UK

by Naharnet Newsdesk 19 May 2015, 18:21

A chemical linked to a rare poison was found in the body of a wealthy Russian businessman who died suddenly in Britain three years ago, a newspaper report said Tuesday.

Alexander Perepilichny was helping an investigation into an alleged money laundering scheme involving Russian tax officials at the time of his death, The Times added.

The 44-year-old collapsed outside his mansion on a luxury private estate on the outskirts of Weybridge in Surrey, near London, on November 10, 2012.

Bob Moxon Browne, a lawyer for Perepilichny's life insurance company, told a pre-inquest hearing into the death that test results had revealed a chemical that could be traced to the poison Gelsemium, The Times reported.

"Once you have knocked out man-made analogues then you are bound to conclude Mr Perepilichny ingested Gelsemium on the day of his death," the lawyer said.

"Then, given that it only grows in China and is a known weapon of assassination by Chinese and Russian contract killers, why was it in his stomach?"

Contacted by AFP, the lawyer and the Surrey coroner leading the inquest declined to comment.

A spokeswoman for the Royal Botanic Gardens in London told AFP the institution "has supplied its expertise in plant chemistry to assist the coroner's inquest".

But she declined to comment further "due to the sensitive nature of this work" until the inquest is completed, as expected later this year.

Gelsemium elegans is the most toxic variety of the gelsemium plant and only grows in Asia.

It is also known as "heartbreak grass" and early symptoms of ingestion include dizziness, nausea and convulsions.

Higher doses can cause paralysis of the spinal cord, a loss of muscular power and eventually asphyxia.

According to British press reports at the time of his death, Perepilichny was providing evidence on the death of anti-corruption lawyer Sergei Magnitsky in a Russian jail in 2009.

Magnitsky died at the age of 37 after being held in a notoriously squalid Russian prison during a fraud probe against his client, US investment firm Hermitage Capital.

Before he was detained, the lawyer claimed to have uncovered a scheme used by police officials to reclaim about $235 million in taxes paid by Hermitage Capital, once Russia's largest Western investment fund.

But instead officials charged Magnitsky with fraud and put him in jail.

Source: Agence France Presse

 99 
 on: May 20, 2015, 06:01 AM 
Started by Steve - Last post by Rad
European Nations Synchronize Laws on Islamist 'Foreign Fighters'

by Naharnet Newsdesk 20 May 2015, 06:52

Ministers from 47 European nations agreed for the first time Tuesday to harmonize their laws to stop so-called foreign fighters travelling to Iraq and Syria to join jihadist groups.

The agreement by the Council of Europe, a pan-European rights group which includes the EU but also takes in countries such as Russia and Turkey, will make cross-border tracking and prosecutions easier.

Under the agreement signed by foreign ministers, countries must criminalize acts such as "participating in an association or group for the purpose of terrorism", "receiving training for terrorism" and "travelling abroad for the purpose of terrorism".

They also agreed to set up a round-the-clock information sharing network on relevant suspects.

"The police of the different member states will be able to make contact with the police in other countries when they arrest on their borders people who are suspected of being foreign fighters," CoE Secretary General Thorbjorn Jagland told a news conference.

Member states still have to ratify the deal individually following Tuesday's meeting in Brussels of the group, which was set up shortly after World War II.

A lack of agreement between countries over how legally to define suspects had been a major obstacle to the creation of an EU database of "foreign fighters" from European nations.

EU nationals who have returned to Europe after joining the jihadist cause in the Middle East have been implicated in several recent attacks including the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris in January and an attack on the Brussels Jewish Museum in May 2014.

Source: Agence France Presse

 100 
 on: May 20, 2015, 05:59 AM 
Started by Rad - Last post by Rad
Poroshenko Says Ukraine Waging 'Real War' with Russia

by Naharnet Newsdesk 20 May 2015, 11:24

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said in an interview broadcast on Wednesday that his crisis-torn country was fighting a "real war" with Russia that could escalate at any time.

The pro-Western leader said the weekend capture of two purported Russian special service soldiers proved that the separatist uprising in the industrial east of Ukraine was a guise for a Moscow-orchestrated campaigned aimed at breaking up Ukraine.

"Can I be absolutely clear with you this is not a fight with Russian-backed separatists, this is a real war with Russia," the 49-year-old Ukrainian leader told the BBC.

"The fact that we captured... Russian regular special forces soldiers (is) strong evidence of that."

Ukraine's military on Tuesday showed off two Russians taken prisoner during a firefight in Lugansk -- a blue collar region that together with neighbouring Donetsk revolted against Kiev's shift towards the West 13 months.

The men testified during a taped interrogation that they were members of a 200-strong Russian reconnaissance unit that entered the warzone nearly two months ago.

The United Nations believes that the entire conflict has claimed at least 6,250 lives and driven more than a million people from their homes.

A second truce agreement Poroshenko struck with Russian President Vladimir Putin with the help of the leaders of Germany and France in February has thus far failed to take complete hold.

Ukraine lost at least eight servicemen since Monday in clashes across both renegade provinces. Kiev's armed forces blame the violence on a new infusion of Russian troops.

"I believe they are preparing an offensive and I think we should be ready and... not give them any chance for a provocation. That will totally be their responsibility," the Ukrainian president said.

Poroshenko stressed that he did not necessarily "trust" Putin but had no choice but to seek a diplomatic solution to the crisis with the Russian leader because the war could not be resolved with guns and tanks.

"I don't have any option," said Poroshenko, who conceded that Ukraine was not strong enough to push back Russian troops. "I doubt the release of my territory could happen by military means."

There was no immediate response to Poroshenko's comments from either the Kremlin or the Russian foreign ministry.

Moscow acknowledges the presence of Russian "volunteers" and off-duty servicemen in Ukraine while rejecting charges that they were there under orders from Putin's generals.

Source: Agence France Presse

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
Video