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Stacie
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« on: Dec 26, 2013, 06:05 PM »

Hello Friends,

I am wondering about astrological correlations for Asperger's Syndrome, and insight into this condition from an EA point of view.  As a purely intuitive guess, my feeling is co-rulership of venus and uranus (taurus/2nd hs, libra/7th, aquarius 11th). Venus naturally correlates to needs, values, expectations, self-reliance, giving/listening/sharing, personal resources..this of course in the context of  inner and outer relationship, the interface between. In Asperger's there seems to be a disproportionately intense orientation to inner/personal reality (taurus/2nd) with a relative degree of detachment (uranus/11th-aquarius) from the outer side of venus: other individuals..their values/needs/expectations/realities/resources etc. (7th/libra)

Could the relative detachment from outer relationships and intensified focus on self-relationship be linked to an acutely heightened survival instinct resulting from trauma?..personal trauma and/or maybe witnessing trauma to loved ones? Is a core issue within Asperger's (which could manifest in all kinds of ways)  linked with one failing to utilize inner resources in the past when they were needed on account of some outside conflict, and thus in this life the internal focus is intensifed? I am also wondering if this condition could be a reaction to prior fragmentation that may have occurred to one's own values and needs, making it difficult to fully relate to or consider the values and needs of others?

 Any thoughts on how loved ones can relate most effectively with an individual with Asperger's, particularly in relationship roles where emotional connectedness is important, such as a lover/spouse/committed partner, parent/child, . 

Thank you,
Stacie
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Upasika
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 27, 2013, 01:16 AM »

Hi Stacie,

I am packing up and just about to take off camping so can't contribute anything at this stage. But I will be fascinated to see what comes of your question The only experience I have is strong mental 3rd/9th issues indicated, nodal axis 2nd-8th, Libra 2nd house cusp, skipped steps from the 5th involving Uranus - trauma is definitely involved. Of course each chart is unique so not sure if these few details will be relevant to your question. But to establish some basic principles would be great, very helpful for me too...

blessings Upasika
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Rad
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 27, 2013, 08:58 AM »

Hi Stacie,

I am posting a fact sheet for Asperger's Syndrome so others can review it and then comment on your questions.

God Bless, Rad


                                 Asperger Syndrome Fact Sheet

What is Asperger syndrome?

Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one of a distinct group of complex neurodevelopment disorders characterized by social impairment, communication difficulties, and restrictive, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior.  Other ASDs include autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS).  ASDs are considered neurodevelopmental disorders and are present from infancy or early childhood.  Although early diagnosis using standardized screening by age 2 is the goal, many with ASD are not detected until later because of limited social demands and support from parents and caregivers in early life.

The severity of communication and behavioral deficits, and the degree of disability, is variable in those affected by ASD.  Some individuals with ASD are severely disabled and require very substantial support for basic activities of daily living.  Asperger syndrome is considered by many to be the mildest form of ASD and is synonymous with the most highly functioning individuals with ASD.

Two core features of autism are: a) social and communication deficits and b) fixated interests and repetitive behaviors.  The social communication deficits in highly functioning persons with Asperger syndrome include lack of the normal back and forth conversation; lack of typical eye contact, body language, and facial expression; and trouble maintaining relationships.  Fixated interests and repetitive behaviors include repetitive use of objects or phrases, stereotyped movements, and excessive attachment to routines, objects, or interests.  Persons with ASD may also respond to sensory aspects of their environment with unusual indifference or excessive interest.

The prevalence of AS is not well established.  It is often not recognized before age 5 or 6 because language development is normal.  Although ASD varies significantly in character and severity, it occurs in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups and affects every age group.  Experts estimate that as many as 1 in 88 children age 8 will have an autism spectrum disorder1  No studies have yet been conducted to determine the incidence of Asperger syndrome in adult populations, but studies of children with the disorder suggest that their problems with socialization and communication continue into adulthood.  Some of these children develop additional psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescence and adulthood.  Males are four times more likely than girls to have ASD.

Studies of children with Asperger syndrome suggest that their problems with socialization and communication continue into adulthood.  Some of these children develop additional psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescence and adulthood.

 1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, March 30, 2012.
Why is it called Asperger syndrome?

In 1944, an Austrian pediatrician named Hans Asperger observed four children in his practice who had difficulty integrating socially.  Although their intelligence appeared normal, the children lacked nonverbal communication skills, failed to demonstrate empathy with their peers, and were physically awkward.  Their speech was either disjointed or overly formal, and their all-absorbing interest in a single topic dominated their conversations.  Dr. Asperger called the condition “autistic psychopathy” and described it as a personality disorder primarily marked by social isolation.

Asperger’s observations, published in German, were not widely known until 1981, when an English doctor named Lorna Wing published a series of case studies of children showing similar symptoms, which she called “Asperger’s” syndrome.  Wing’s writings were widely published and popularized.  AS became a distinct disease and diagnosis in 1992, when it was included in the tenth published edition of the World Health Organization’s diagnostic manual, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), and in 1994 it was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical  Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic reference book.   However, scientific studies have not been able to definitively differentiate Asperger syndrome from highly functioning autism.  Because autism is defined by a common set of behaviors, changes that were announced in DSM-V (which took effect in mid-2013) represent the various forms under a single diagnostic category, ASD.

What are some common signs or symptoms?

Children with Asperger syndrome may have speech marked by a lack of rhythm, an odd inflection, or a monotone pitch.  They often lack the ability to modulate the volume of their voice to match their surroundings.  For example, they may have to be reminded to talk softly every time they enter a library or a movie theatre.

Unlike the severe withdrawal from the rest of the world that is characteristic of autism, children with Asperger syndrome are isolated because of their poor social skills and narrow interests.  Children with the disorder will gather enormous amounts of factual information about their favorite subject and will talk incessantly about it, but the conversation may seem like a random collection of facts or statistics, with no point or conclusion.   They may approach other people, but make normal conversation difficult by eccentric behaviors or by wanting only to talk about their singular interest.

Many children with AS are highly active in early childhood, but some may not reach milestones as early as other children regarding motor skills such as pedaling a bike, catching a ball, or climbing outdoor play equipment.   They are often awkward and poorly coordinated with a walk that can appear either stilted or bouncy.

Some children with AS may develop anxiety or depression in young adulthood.  Other conditions that often co-exist with Asperger syndrome are Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), tic disorders (such as Tourette syndrome), depression, anxiety disorders, and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

What causes Asperger syndrome?

The cause of ASD, including Asperger syndrome, is not known.  Current research points to brain abnormalities in Asperger syndrome.   Using advanced brain imaging techniques, scientists have revealed structural and functional differences in specific regions of the brains of children who have Asperger syndrome versus those who do not have the disorder.  These differences may be caused by the abnormal migration of embryonic cells during fetal development that affects brain structure and “wiring” in early childhood and then goes on to affect the neural circuits that control thought and behavior.

For example, one study found a reduction of brain activity in the frontal lobe of children with Asperger syndrome when they were asked to respond to tasks that required them to use their judgment.  Another study found differences in activity when children were asked to respond to facial expressions.  A different study investigating brain function in adults with AS revealed abnormal levels of specific proteins that correlate with obsessive and repetitive behaviors. 

Scientists have long suspected that there are genetic and environmental components to Asperger syndrome and the other ASDs because of their tendency to run in families and their high concordance in twins.  Additional evidence for the link between inherited genetic mutations and AS was observed in the higher incidence of family members who have behavioral symptoms similar to AS but in a more limited form, including slight difficulties with social interaction, language, or reading.

A specific gene for Asperger syndrome, however, has never been identified.  Instead, the most recent research indicates that there are most likely a common group of genes whose variations or deletions make an individual vulnerable to developing ASD.  This combination of genetic variations or deletions, in combination with yet unidentified environmental insults, probably determines the severity and symptoms for each individual with Asperger syndrome.

How is it diagnosed?

The diagnosis of Asperger syndrome is complicated by the lack of a standardized diagnostic test.  In fact, because there are several screening instruments in current use, each with different criteria, the same child could receive different diagnoses, depending on the screening tool the doctor uses. 

Asperger syndrome, also sometimes called high-functioning autism (HFA), is viewed as being on the mild end of the ASD spectrum with symptoms that differ in degree  from  autistic disorder.

Some of the autistic behaviors may be apparent in the first few months of a child’s life, or they may not become evident until later. 

The diagnosis of Asperger syndrome and all other autism spectrum disorders is done as part of a two-stage process.  The first stage begins with developmental screening during a “well-child” check-up with a family doctor or pediatrician.  The second stage is a comprehensive team evaluation to either rule in or rule out AS.  This team generally includes a psychologist, neurologist, psychiatrist, speech therapist, and additional professionals who have expertise in diagnosing children with AS.

The comprehensive evaluation includes neurologic and genetic assessment, with in-depth cognitive and language testing to establish IQ and evaluate psychomotor function, verbal and non-verbal strengths and weaknesses, style of learning, and independent living skills.    An assessment of communication strengths and weaknesses includes evaluating non-verbal forms of communication (gaze and gestures); the use of non-literal language (metaphor, irony, absurdities, and humor); patterns of inflection, stress and volume modulation; pragmatics (turn-taking and sensitivity to verbal cues); and the content, clarity, and coherence of conversation.  The physician will look at the testing results and combine them with the child’s developmental history and current symptoms to make a diagnosis.

Are there treatments available?

There is no cure for Asperger syndrome and the autism spectrum disorders.  The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of individual children.  There is no single best treatment package for all children with AS, but most health care professionals agree that early intervention is best.

An effective treatment program builds on the child’s interests, offers a predictable schedule, teaches tasks as a series of simple steps, actively engages the child’s attention in highly structured activities, and provides regular reinforcement of behavior.  This kind of program generally includes:

    social skills training, a form of group therapy that teaches children with AS the skills they need to interact more successfully with other children

    cognitive behavioral therapy, a type of “talk” therapy that can help the more explosive or anxious children to manage their emotions better and cut back on obsessive interests and repetitive routines

    medication, if necessary, for co-existing conditions such as depression and anxiety

    occupational or physical therapy, for children with sensory integration problems or poor motor coordination

    specialized speech/language therapy, to help children who have trouble with the pragmatics of speech –the give and take of normal conversation, and

    parent training and support, to teach parents behavioral techniques to use at home.

Do children with AS get better?

With effective treatment, children with AS can learn to overcome their disabilities, but they may still find social situations and personal relationships challenging.  Many adults with Asperger syndrome work successfully in mainstream jobs, although they may continue to need encouragement and moral support to maintain an independent life.

What research is being done?

Within the Federal government, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), supports and conducts research on the brain and nervous system.  The NINDS and other NIH components support research on autism spectrum disorders, either at NIH laboratories or through grants to major research institutions across the country. 

In 1997, at the request of Congress, the NIH formed its Autism Coordinating Committee (NIH/ACC) to enhance the quality, pace, and coordination of efforts at the NIH to find a cure for autism (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/autism-spectrum-disorders-pervasive-developmental-disorders/nih-initiatives/nih-autism-coordinating-committee.shtml). The NIH/ACC involves the participation of seven NIH Institutes and Centers: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders,  the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institute of Nursing Research, and the National Center on Complementary and Alternative Medicine.  The NIH/ACC has been instrumental in the understanding of and advances in ASD research.  The NIH/ACC also participates in the broader Federal Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) that is composed of representatives from various component agencies of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the U.S. Department of Education and other government organizations.

In fiscal years 2007 and 2008, NIH began funding the 11 Autism Centers of Excellence (ACE), coordinated by the NIH/ACC.  The ACEs are investigating early brain development and functioning, social interactions in infants, rare genetic variants and mutations, associations between autism-related genes and physical traits, possible environmental risk factors and biomarkers, and a potential new medication treatment.

 Where can I get more information?

For more information on neurological disorders or research programs funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, contact the Institute's Brain Resources and Information Network (BRAIN) at:
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Gonzalo
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 27, 2013, 10:06 AM »

Hi Stacie

Here’s a ling to a prior question, and Rad’s reply, about a kid who was diagnosed as ‘Asperger’ (the initial diagnosis was Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, but later was diagnosed as Asperger). This is the link:
http://schoolofevolutionaryastrology.com/forum/index.php?topic=335.msg5206#msg5206

In this case, the archetypes you suggest are quite intensified.

It is a very interesting question to me. At the astrodienst data bank at astro.com there are (I found) three charts under ‘Asperger’. Also, I know that Stephen Spiellberg was ‘diagnosed’ this way. These four charts have the archetypes you consider very intensified:

- One of this charts has Pluto/Saturn in the 2nd House and Uranus Rx is conjunct the North Node 12th House in Gemini.

- Other has a stellium of planets in the 2nd House including Uranus and Mercury, with Pluto in Libra in the 1st House, the South Node being conjunct Venus in the 3rd House Capricorn, ruled by Saturn in the 12th House.

- Other has Pluto/Saturn in the 2nd House, square the nodes, with the North Node in the 11th House conjunct Venus in Cancer, ruled by the Moon in Capricorn conjunct the South Node.

- Other has Pluto/Uranus in the 7th House in Virgo, the North Node in the 3rd House Taurus conjuncts the Moon, ruled by Venus in the 4th House Gemini, squaring the Pluto/Uranus, and inconjunct Neptune in the 9th House Scorpio (which conjuncts the South Node Scorpio). 

I think the example charts that would need to be used to understand the nature of Asperger should be picked carefully, because the diagnosis of Asperger has evolved from an initial too vague or ample description, to becoming a more precise clinical condition recently. 

The link to the boy’s chart has some of Rad’s recommendations about how the parents can help the kid. The evolution of the kid has been wonderful to date. He is a quite tender and loving kid now, and his situation at school and with friends has been constantly improving.

Looking forward to further participation. 
God Bless, Gonzalo
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Stacie
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 27, 2013, 02:40 PM »

Upasika, thank you for your input..i'm glad you share interest in the topic. I look forward to more of your comments.

Thank you very much Rad for posting the fact sheet for Asperger's.

Thank you Gonzalo for the link to the earlier thread. I tried searching the MB for aspergers but nothing came back in my search, so I'm glad to discover this material. Also thank you for letting us about the example charts from Astrodeinst.  I am reviewing this information now. 

Stacie
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Stacie
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« Reply #5 on: Dec 27, 2013, 03:29 PM »

Hi Upasika, just curious..you mentioned the 2/8 nodal access with libra on the 2nd..which node resides in the 2nd?

Take care my friend, hope you're camping trip is replenishing and safe Smiley
« Last Edit: Dec 28, 2013, 01:30 AM by Stacie » Logged
Stacie
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« Reply #6 on: Dec 27, 2013, 06:04 PM »

Gonzalo, that thread you linked is very helpful in directing some of the intuitions I'm having about EA dynamics/signatures that may be common to Aspergers. 

When Rad discusses the 3 key examples of past life truama associated with the boys current life condition which includes the diagnosis of Aspergers, I do hear some of the underlying theme I was trying to describe in my original post: internalized trauma relative to a core conflict between the inner/outer sides of venus.  From the excruitiating pain of witnessing the extermination of himself, his parents, and other loved ones who were a part of his armenian community, to the lifetime where he found himself on the opposite side of 'extermination' (germany/concentration camps) where he knew deep down that the orders and value associations being imposed by german nazi leadership and followed by peers was naturally wrong, which ultimately led to his death by alloed forces, to the lifetime in Chile when his efforts to actively resist resulted in torture/death. 

I can see how this type of sequence of events could lead a soul to a place where an impulse could develop to try and shut out or minimize outside perspectives/influences because of the pain, horror, trauma, guilt, confusion, mistakes, failures, etc. connected  to prior results of outside forces dominating inner forces, and how this impulse could be felt by the soul as truly a survival issue.  I'm of course not making any conclusions that these ideas are accurate just yet.. Wink  I would love to hear what others think if anyone else feels inclined to participate in the inquiry of what dynamics and signatures may be characteristic to Aspergers. I suspect I'll have a couple follow up questions for too Gonzalo since you have worked with an example directly.

Love to All

Stacie
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Stacie
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 27, 2013, 10:49 PM »

Hi Gonzalo,

In looking a little further into Steven Spielberg, it appears there has been a lot of controversy about whether he has Asperger's or not.  Do you know of any legit sources that confirm an Asperger diagnosis?

I just found this article about Susan Boyle, who apparently just recieved an Asperger's diagnosis in 2012.  Here's a recent article where she shares about her experience. It's not the richest or deepest content in the world, but since Susan has only recently brought her AS diagnosis to the public I thought it was relevant.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/dec/08/susan-boyle-autism

For anyone interested in viewing Susan Boyle's chart, here is a link to the image from an earlier thread on this MB:  
http://i417.photobucket.com/albums/pp255/arimoshe/susanboyletransits.jpg
 


Stacie
« Last Edit: Dec 28, 2013, 01:14 AM by Stacie » Logged
Stacie
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« Reply #8 on: Dec 28, 2013, 12:59 AM »

I feel this article presents an important perspective on the issue of Asperger Syndrome in the context of personal relationships, relative to therapy/treatment:

-------

Asperger’s and Relationship Counseling
By Cary Terra on June 28th, 2012
One of the frustrating things I encounter in my work is witnessing the damage done to clients (and to their relationships) by well-meaning therapists who believe Asperger’s and relationships are incompatible.

I know, you think I am exaggerating. Really, though, people do think this.

Consider a client I’ll call Eloise, who came to see me in a “last ditch effort” (her words) to save her relationship. Having already visited two couples therapists for help in understanding how to relate to her Aspie husband, she was in the process of resigning herself to the “truth” they had shared with her: her relationship could never meet her emotional needs. Her best bet would be to reframe her relationship as a platonic partnership, and to get her emotional needs met elsewhere. The ideas of knitting clubs and online forums had been proposed, and Eloise was in a state of panic.

After offering this brief history, Eloise stated her purpose in seeing me. She wanted help in moving through the grieving process. She needed to mourn, she said — mourn the normal relationship she would never have. She wanted to know if  I could help her with this grief work, so she could move towards acceptance of this stunted marriage. She couldn’t leave, she explained, because her husband was a wonderful person, though sadly therapists (and books!) had revealed that he was incapable of connecting to her emotionally.

In responding to Eloise, my first task was to breathe through my outrage. The two therapists who had offered Eloise this glimpse of her marital destiny had not even met her husband. Both had “comforted” her by explaining that his withdrawal and disconnectedness had nothing to do with her — rather this was his neurological disorder at work, and nothing could fix it. Beyond the irresponsibility of this crystal ball therapy, their predictions made little sense given recent research on brain plasticity. (See this great TED talk on the subject at http://www.ted.com/talks/michael_merzenich_on_the_elastic_brain.html for a brief introduction.)

The truth is that Asperger’s, and its impact on relationships with self and others, is poorly understood, especially by many clinicians. And certainly no clinician should ever give a prediction for an individual’s lifelong functioning, especially if that person has never been evaluated. Aspies and their partners come to therapy looking for tools and answers, and are often instead given prescriptions for hopelessness. It’s one thing to talk conservatively about treatment goals; it’s another thing to throw out goals altogether.

Therapists often tell clients married to ASD adults that their partners cannot feel empathy and cannot truly love. Perhaps the reason I take such exception to this kind of dangerous feedback is that it’s simply not true. All of my clients feel empathy, and all are capable of love. In fact, many times my Aspie clients are shocked to find that their partner’s faith in their love and loyalty can be compromised by a forgotten good-bye or missed eye-contact. One Aspie partner remarked: “How can our whole relationship hang by a thread? It makes me afraid to open my mouth for fear I’ll accidentally destroy my marriage.” Of course, this anxiety furthers ASD clients’ reluctance to establish connection, which furthers their partners’ feelings of being ignored or neglected.

Partners with Asperger’s have often spent a lifetime making unpredictable relationship mistakes that carry real repercussions. When the probability is high that your efforts to connect will be met with rejection, it’s awfully hard to justify the logic of continuing to try. Successful relationship therapy involves identifying triggers so that both partners can work towards feeling safe together. This is the foundation of building connection.

Clinicians are trained to use good communication to build safety, rather than building safety to facilitate good communication. I’m proposing the notion of working together to establish safety first. This is crucial for creating a context in which people with Asperger’s can experiment with being vulnerable, and non-Aspie partners can experiment with interpreting behavior in brand new ways.

About the Author: Cary Terra, LMFT, is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice in Seattle, Washington. She specializes in working with adults with Asperger’s, their partners, and their family members. This piece first appeared on her blog, Aspie Strategy, and is reprinted here by permission.
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Upasika
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« Reply #9 on: Dec 28, 2013, 04:00 AM »

Hi Stacie,

Caught me a few hours before leaving - wow, lots of info from Gonzalo and Rad already ... anyway north node in Scorpio in 2nd, ruler Pluto in Scorpio 3rd, ruler of Taurus South Node and the Libra 2nd house cusp, Venus, is in the 9th in Gem, Merc is in close balsamic conj to Venus ...

Will tune back in once back from holiday and caught up on Darwin. Thanks for the good wishes!

blessings Upasika
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Gonzalo
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« Reply #10 on: Dec 28, 2013, 06:11 PM »

Hi Stacie

 "Do you know of any legit sources that confirm an Asperger diagnosis?"

No .. perhaps not a good example, and I remember we should not look at this chart here, because of the rules that were defined for posting charts of living people ...
God Bless, Gonzalo   
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Stacie
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« Reply #11 on: Dec 30, 2013, 04:39 AM »

Ah, this does present a challenge, finding a non-living person/chart to look at with confirmed diagnosis since Asperger Syndrome hasnt been around (i.e.recognized) too long. Well shoot. I do understand the need and purpose of the guideline however, so I will see if there's another way to explore this.

Stacie
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DeeDee
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« Reply #12 on: Jan 03, 2014, 03:51 PM »

Hello Everyone,
I am new to this forum and this is my first time posting.  Regarding the topic of Asperger's Syndrome and chart signatures, I feel I may have a little to contribute.  I have been in relationship with a man off and on for 11 years whom I feel has Asperger's Syndrome.  He would never go for any type of evaluation so we will never know for sure if this is the right diagnosis. His chart is quite interesting from an EA point of view. 

3/21/1949, 6:32 am
Hill Air Force Base, Utah
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Gonzalo
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« Reply #13 on: Jan 17, 2014, 07:00 AM »

Hi Stacie,
The kid's mother is quite curious and she has authorized her son's chart to be used as an example for us to understand AS nature and potential natal signatures. So, if you are interested in using this chart, just let me know and I can post or have the birth data emailed to you.
God Bless, Gonzalo  
« Last Edit: Jan 17, 2014, 08:05 AM by Gonzalo » Logged
poetree
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« Reply #14 on: Feb 08, 2014, 12:41 AM »

The title caught my eye because I know of a wonderful Abraham Hicks video...
Basically the question is, "If we choose our life, Why autism?"
And basically the answer is, "Autism is a way of choosing not to be controlled. Here to teach unconditional love."

at 6 minutes, 10 seconds
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHMdNnHFqiI

To relate this to the astrological chart (and seeing Aspergers as sort of a 'lesser' of Autism), your inclination to think of Uranus and Venus makes perfect sense. Uranus, not being controlled, and Venus wanting to bring in harmony and balance. I might also wonder where the Nodes fit into all of this. Maybe Uranus is also conjunct the Node, and maybe all of this is conjunct the Sun, getting swallowed up in the fire. Maybe all of this is in the 12th house so it's unconscious. Or Maybe it's just Mercury that's hung up somewhere, since much of this has a lot to do with not communicating well, or not recognizing emotions in other people by their facial expressions or body language. (Though I would think a higher sensitivity to energy body).

Lots of maybes. I would be interested to see a chart of someone who actually thought or knew they had either Aspergers or Autism.

Hope you enjoy the video, though. I love the message.
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