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Author Topic: Pluto in Cap, the USA, the future of the world  (Read 383561 times)
adina
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« Reply #75 on: Aug 17, 2010, 01:42 PM »

Thanks for posting that article, Rad. While this isn't surprising, it's still shocking and sickening to see the actual figures in black and white! I hope the current administration, including Congress, grows a pair and let's the tax break for the richest expire.

David Cay Johnston, the tax journalist mentioned in the article, has written several books, including Free Lunch: How The Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves At Government Expense (And Stick You With The Bill).  I read it a couple of years ago and highly recommend it. In it he covers the Enron debacle, as well as while we're still paying such high prices for energy; how we're subsidizing the big box retailers like WalMart, as well as how they continue to squeeze out any small, local "competitors;" how we also subsidize sports arenas and teams and the ginormous salaries athletes get paid; the fraud of the so-called health care and pharmaceutical industries, and much, much more.
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Elen
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« Reply #76 on: Aug 17, 2010, 09:01 PM »

Hi All,

One thought I had about money that is one of the things that gives me hope is the whole phenomenon of alternative currencies.  I read somewhere (I think on the Slow Money website) that the Berkshire, an alternative currency out in western Massachusetts, recently reached the million mark in circulation.  That, to me, is amazing.  A whole subculture doing business using a local currency that is designed to stay in the community.  Money has value because we - the people (aq) - give it value.  Neptune's presence in the equation says we have collectively decided to create the illusion around the dollar.  But the dollar has power because we let it - we use it and accept it, etc., etc.  This is one of those small things that I think could have a major impact in time, as it builds up more steam presumably spreading along with it the whole notion of smaller, local, sustainable...

Peace,
Ellen
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Bradley J
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« Reply #77 on: Aug 19, 2010, 12:57 AM »

Rad,

Thank you for correcting me when I've strayed from the core evolutionary symbols.
This does bring up a question for me.

What i saw myself doing was applying the totality of the archetype to the north nodes sign.
I remember watching on the dvds and learning about how, for example, to fully understand one's ego to look at the moon, the forth house, the sign on the cusp of the 4th house and the planetary ruler of the fourth house, and planetary aspects to the moon.  
This question is a bit off topic in this thread, but here it is anyway - Well, looking back on all i've learned so far, i actually do not recall seeing this approach taught when looking at evolutionary core symbols.
I guess what i'm trying to ask is.. is it ever something to do - like, with the example of the USA chart, becasue the north node is in leo, this process is facilitated by the ruler - the sun.  do we ever extend this by looking at the 5th house, the cusp of, it's ruler, etc.?

Also, thinking of the USA and asking about seeing it's pluto polarity point activated - this is hard for me to see.  Any examples to be offered of this?  

Grateful to your commitment to teaching,
Blessings,
Bradley
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Rad
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« Reply #78 on: Aug 19, 2010, 11:10 AM »

Hi Bradley,

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Rad,

Thank you for correcting me when I've strayed from the core evolutionary symbols.
This does bring up a question for me.

What i saw myself doing was applying the totality of the archetype to the north nodes sign.
I remember watching on the dvds and learning about how, for example, to fully understand one's ego to look at the moon, the forth house, the sign on the cusp of the 4th house and the planetary ruler of the fourth house, and planetary aspects to the moon.  This question is a bit off topic in this thread, but here it is anyway - Well, looking back on all i've learned so far, i actually do not recall seeing this approach taught when looking at evolutionary core symbols. I guess what i'm trying to ask is.. is it ever something to do - like, with the example of the USA chart, becasue the north node is in leo, this process is facilitated by the ruler - the sun.  do we ever extend this by looking at the 5th house, the cusp of, it's ruler, etc.?

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Yes, to understand the TOTALITY of any given archetype then one looks to all the symbols that correlate with that archetype as JWG taught. Thus, with that Neptune that you have asked about it is part of the Leo archetype cause it is in the 5th House. And it does refer back to Mercury retro in Cancer in the 3rd, which is where the N.Node is. And then you trace it down from there as I mentioned in my response to you. In terms of the USA chart this Neptune does correlate to it's 'origin' issues. So in the 5th House and Virgo, ruled by Mercury retro in Cancer, opposed by Pluto in Capricorn, that then trines that Neptune, the Mercury referring to the Moon / Lucifer conjunction in Aquarius in the 10th, and they  then refer to the Cancer planets, including the Sun, in the 2nd, the ruler of the N.Node itself, you can then see that the original USA was structured as a 'tiered' system of classes of people roughly defined around those that had wealth and property, and those that did not. Even the intent of the creation of a Senate was to protect and guard the interests of the wealthy, the elite: inferior / superior as symbolized by the Neptune in Virgo. And of course the original USA had slaves that were considered property by their owners, and those slaves were Black people: Pluto in Capricorn trining that Neptune. Within this there were many slave laborers as in the Chinese. And of course the ultimate delusion, Neptune, as defined in the doctrine called Manifest Destiny, N.Node in Leo, ruled by the Cancer Sun in the 2nd, the Neptune in Virgo in the 5th trine the Pluto in the 9th, and that opposed the Mercury, ruler of the Neptune, which is ruled by the 10th House Moon/Lucifer conjunction in Aquarius, which comes back to the Cancer planets in the 2nd. So the race called Caucasian was considered superior to the Native American Indians ( and any other race ) who of course lived in America first, the Christian religion superior to the beliefs of these Indians, and thus the justification in the evil doctrine that justified the genocide of these native peoples including the purposeful introduction of disease to do so: TB. And, guess what, that evil doctrine was created in the 1820's when NEPTUNE WAS TRANSITING IN CAPRICORN, AND TRINE ITSELF. All of this is within these symbols.

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Also, thinking of the USA and asking about seeing it's pluto polarity point activated - this is hard for me to see.  Any examples to be offered of this? 

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Yes, this polarity point is really about evolving beyond how the USA was initially structured, as above.  The natal structure is the Pluto opposed the Mercury retro which is essentially the polarity point of Pluto. Thus, the evolution is liberating from that original structure of superior/ inferior and the classes of people that this correlates too. Evolving into a system of true social equity: Moon in Aquarius with Lucifer, the God part of this. The first manifestation of this of course was the Civil War, and the issue of slavery. And there have been other times in which this effort has been attempted as when Teddy Roosevelt tried and succeeded in creating all kinds of new laws and regulations concerning the power of the rich, and their corporations in the early 1900's. FDR. Then Kennedy which lead to LBJ and the 'great society' that he tried to create in your country. He has a natal 11th House Pluto for example. Then came Clinton and his successful effort to redistribute income by way of his tax policies, that were then all undone by Bush and his Republican party: the total deregulation of the financial industry that had been in place by FDR. And that indeed was caused by the 400 families that has lead to Obama trying to undo as much as he can, yet he is being overpowered by the Corporate reality, and the 400 families at every turn. This is why the USA in now on the road to fascism, and turning the vast majority of the population into nothing but indentured servants to the Corporations: NETPUNE IN VIRGO, INDENTURED SERVANTS, TRINE PLUTO IN CAPRICORN, THE CORPORATIONS. And now the transit of Pluto in Capricorn. Hmm.

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God Bless, Rad
« Last Edit: Aug 19, 2010, 11:19 AM by Rad » Logged
Rad
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« Reply #79 on: Sep 05, 2010, 09:45 AM »

Hi All,

 I found the below article in the American magazine Time. It is a detailed article as to the future directions of the USA as embodied in President Obama's Recovery and Stimulus Plan. Just reading through this creates many reactions in me. One is that this blueprint is exactly what that country needs to move forwards relative to Pluto in Capricorn, and Uranus in Aries for the next 8 years. Another is the evil fact that of course the Corporations and the politicians that they own are doing all they can to prevent and undermine this plan. And another has me wondering as to how many American do you feel are actually aware of what Obama is trying to create in this plan ? Given that the average American 'intelligence' is nothing more than a collection of Corporate Media sound bytes I would wager not to many. And that, indeed, is the real tragedy of America.

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How the Stimulus Is Changing America
By Michael Grunwald

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 — President Obama's $787 billion stimulus — has been marketed as a jobs bill, and that's how it's been judged. The White House says it has saved or created about 3 million jobs, helping avoid a depression and end a recession. Republicans mock it as a Big Government boondoggle that has failed to prevent rampant unemployment despite a massive expansion of the deficit. Liberals complain that it wasn't massive enough.

It's an interesting debate. Politically, it's awkward to argue that things would have been even worse without the stimulus, even though that's what most nonpartisan economists believe. But the battle over the Recovery Act's short-term rescue has obscured its more enduring mission: a long-term push to change the country. It was about jobs, sure, but also about fighting oil addiction and global warming, transforming health care and education, and building a competitive 21st century economy. Some Republicans have called it an under-the-radar scramble to advance Obama's agenda — and they've got a point. (See TIME's special report "The Green Design 100.")

Yes, the stimulus has cut taxes for 95% of working Americans, bailed out every state, hustled record amounts of unemployment benefits and other aid to struggling families and funded more than 100,000 projects to upgrade roads, subways, schools, airports, military bases and much more. But in the words of Vice President Joe Biden, Obama's effusive Recovery Act point man, "Now the fun stuff starts!" The "fun stuff," about one-sixth of the total cost, is an all-out effort to exploit the crisis to make green energy, green building and green transportation real; launch green manufacturing industries; computerize a pen-and-paper health system; promote data-driven school reforms; and ramp up the research of the future. "This is a chance to do something big, man!" Biden said during a 90-minute interview with TIME.

For starters, the Recovery Act is the most ambitious energy legislation in history, converting the Energy Department into the world's largest venture-capital fund. It's pouring $90 billion into clean energy, including unprecedented investments in a smart grid; energy efficiency; electric cars; renewable power from the sun, wind and earth; cleaner coal; advanced biofuels; and factories to manufacture green stuff in the U.S. The act will also triple the number of smart electric meters in our homes, quadruple the number of hybrids in the federal auto fleet and finance far-out energy research through a new government incubator modeled after the Pentagon agency that fathered the Internet. (See TIME's special report "After One Year, A Stimulus Report Card.")

The only stimulus energy program that's gotten much attention so far — chiefly because it got off to a slow start — is a $5 billion effort to weatherize homes. But the Recovery Act's line items represent the first steps to a low-carbon economy. "It will leverage a very different energy future," says Kristin Mayes, the Republican chair of Arizona's utility commission. "It really moves us toward a tipping point." (Watch the video "TIME Polls America: Spend or Cut?")

The stimulus is also stocked with nonenergy game changers, like a tenfold increase in funding to expand access to broadband and an effort to sequence more than 2,300 complete human genomes — when only 34 were sequenced with all previous aid. There's $8 billion for a high-speed passenger rail network, the boldest federal transportation initiative since the interstate highways. There's $4.35 billion in Race to the Top grants to promote accountability in public schools, perhaps the most significant federal education initiative ever — it's already prompted 35 states and the District of Columbia to adopt reforms to qualify for the cash. There's $20 billion to move health records into the digital age, which should reduce redundant tests, dangerous drug interactions and errors caused by doctors with chicken-scratch handwriting. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius calls that initiative the foundation for Obama's health care reform and "maybe the single biggest component in improving quality and lowering costs." (Comment on this story.)

Any of those programs would have been a revolution in its own right. "We've seen more reform in the last year than we've seen in decades, and we haven't spent a dime yet," says Education Secretary Arne Duncan. "It's staggering how the Recovery Act is driving change." (See where employment will rebound in the U.S.)

That was the point. Critics have complained that while the New Deal left behind iconic monuments — courthouses, parks, the Lincoln Tunnel, the Grand Coulee Dam — this New New Deal will leave a mundane legacy of sewage plants, repaved roads, bus repairs and caulked windows. In fact, it will create new icons too: solar arrays, zero-energy border stations, an eco-friendly Coast Guard headquarters, an "advanced synchrotron light source" in a New York lab. But its main legacy will be change. The stimulus passed just a month after Obama's inauguration, but it may be his signature effort to reshape America — as well as its government. (See pictures of Barack Obama behind the scenes on Inauguration Day.)

                                                   "Let's Just Go Build It!"
After Obama's election, Depression scholar Christina Romer delivered a freak-out briefing to his transition team, warning that to avoid a 1930s-style collapse, Washington needed to pump at least $800 billion into the frozen economy — and fast. "We were in a tailspin," recalls Romer, who is about to step down as chair of Obama's Council of Economic Advisers. "I was completely sympathetic to the idea that we shouldn't just dig ditches and fill them in. But saving the economy had to be paramount." Obama's economists argued for tax cuts and income transfers to get cash circulating quickly, emergency aid to states to prevent layoffs of cops and teachers and off-the-shelf highway projects to put people to work. They wanted a textbook Keynesian response to an economy in cardiac arrest: adding money to existing programs via existing formulas or handing it to governors, seniors and first-time home buyers. They weren't keen to reinvent the wheel.

But Obama and Biden also saw a golden opportunity to address priorities; they emphasized shovel-worthy as well as shovel-ready. Biden recalls brainstorming with Obama about an all-in push for a smarter electrical grid that would reduce blackouts, promote renewables and give families more control over their energy diet: "We said, 'God, wouldn't it be wonderful? Why don't we invest $100 billion? Let's just go build it!' "

It wasn't that easy. Utilities control the grid, and new wires create thorny not-in-my-backyard zoning issues; there wasn't $100 billion worth of remotely shovel-ready grid projects. It's hard to transform on a timeline, and some congressional Democrats were less interested in transforming government than growing it. For instance, after securing $100 billion for traditional education programs, House Appropriations Committee chairman Dave Obey tried to stop any of it from going to Race to the Top, which is unpopular with teachers' unions.

Ultimately, even Obama's speed focused economists agreed that stimulus spending shouldn't dry up in 2010. And some Democrats were serious about investing wisely, not just spending more. So House Speaker Nancy Pelosi insisted on $17 billion for research. House Education and Labor Committee chairman George Miller fought to save Race to the Top. And while the grid didn't get a $100 billion reinvention, it did get $11 billion after decades of neglect, which could shape trillions of dollars in future utility investments. (See 10 big recession surprises.)

It takes time to set up new programs, but now money is flowing to deliver high-speed Internet to rural areas, spread successful quit-smoking programs and design the first high-speed rail link from Tampa to Orlando. And deep in the Energy Department's basement — in a room dubbed the dungeon — a former McKinsey & Co. partner named Matt Rogers has created a government version of Silicon Valley's Sand Hill Road, blasting billions of dollars into clean-energy projects through a slew of oversubscribed grant programs. "The idea is to transform the entire energy sector," Rogers says. "What's exciting is the way it fits all together."

                                               "They Won't All Succeed"
The green industrial revolution begins with gee-whiz companies like A123 Systems of Watertown, Mass. Founded in 2001 by MIT nanotechnology geeks who landed a $100,000 federal grant, A123 grew into a global player in the lithium-ion battery market, with 1,800 employees and five factories in China. It has won $249 million to build two plants in Michigan, where it will help supply the first generation of mass-market electric cars. At least four of A123's suppliers received stimulus money too. The Administration is also financing three of the world's first electric-car plants, including a $529 million loan to help Fisker Automotive reopen a shuttered General Motors factory in Delaware (Biden's home state) to build sedans powered by A123 batteries. Another A123 customer, Navistar, got cash to build electric trucks in Indiana. And since electric vehicles need juice, the stimulus will also boost the number of U.S. battery-charging stations by 3,200%.

"Without government, there's no way we would've done this in the U.S.," A123 chief technology officer Bart Riley told TIME. "But now you're going to see the industry reach critical mass here."

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Rad
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« Reply #80 on: Sep 05, 2010, 09:47 AM »

The Recovery Act's clean-energy push is designed not only to reduce our old economy dependence on fossil fuels that broil the planet, blacken the Gulf and strengthen foreign petro-thugs but also to avoid replacing it with a new economy that is just as dependent on foreign countries for technology and manufacturing. Last year, exactly two U.S. factories made advanced batteries for electric vehicles. The stimulus will create 30 new ones, expanding U.S. production capacity from 1% of the global market to 20%, supporting half a million plug-ins and hybrids. The idea is as old as land-grant colleges: to use tax dollars as an engine of innovation. It rejects free-market purism but also the old industrial-policy approach of dumping cash into a few favored firms. Instead, the Recovery Act floods the zone, targeting a variety of energy problems and providing seed money for firms with a variety of potential solutions. The winners must attract private capital to match public dollars — A123 held an IPO to raise the required cash — and after competing for grants, they still must compete in the marketplace. "They won't all succeed," Rogers says. "But some will, and they'll change the world." (Watch TIME's video "Google's Energy Initiatives Director Talks Clean Power.")

The investments extend all along the food chain. A brave new world of electric cars powered by coal plants could be dirtier than the oil-soaked status quo, so the stimulus includes an unheard-of $3.4 billion for clean-coal projects aiming to sequester or reuse carbon. There are also lucrative loan guarantees for constructing the first American nuclear plants in three decades. And after the credit crunch froze financing for green energy, stimulus cash has fueled a comeback, putting the U.S. on track to exceed Obama's goal of doubling renewable power by 2012. The wind industry added a record 10,000 megawatts in 2009. The stimulus is also supporting the nation's largest photovoltaic solar plant, in Florida, and what will be the world's two largest solar thermal plants, in Arizona and California, plus thousands of solar installations on homes and buildings.

The stimulus is helping scores of manufacturers of wind turbines and solar products expand as well, but today's grid can only handle so much wind and solar. A key problem is connecting remote wind farms to population centers, so there are billions of dollars for new transmission lines. Then there is the need to find storage capacity for when it isn't windy or sunny outside. The current grid is like a phone system without voice mail, a just-in-time network where power is wasted if it doesn't reach a user the moment it's generated. That's why the Recovery Act is funding dozens of smart-grid approaches. For instance, A123 is providing truckloads of batteries for a grid-storage project in California and recycled electric-car batteries for a similar effort in Detroit. "If we can show the utilities this stuff works," says Riley, "it will take off on its own."

Today, grid-scale storage, solar energy and many other green technologies are too costly to compete without subsidies. That's why the stimulus launched the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), a blue-sky fund inspired by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the incubator for GPS and the M-16 rifle as well as the Internet. Located in an office building a block from the rest of the Energy Department, ARPA-E will finance energy research too risky for private funders, focusing on speculative technologies that might dramatically cut the cost of, say, carbon capture — or not. "We're taking chances, because that's how you put a man on the moon," says director Arun Majumdar, a materials scientist from the University of California, Berkeley. "Our idea is it's O.K. to fail. You think America's pioneers never failed?"


ARPA-E is funding the new pioneers — mad scientists and engineers with ideas for wind turbines based on jet engines, bacteria to convert carbon dioxide into gasoline, and tiny molten-metal batteries to provide cheap high-voltage storage. That last idea is the brainchild of MIT's Donald Sadoway, who already has a prototype fuel cell the size of a shot glass. The stimulus will help him create a kind of reverse aluminum smelter to make prototypes the size of a hockey puck and a pizza box. The ultimate goal is a commercial scale battery the size of a tractor trailer that could power an entire neighborhood. "We need radical breakthroughs, so we need radical experiments," Sadoway says. "These projects send chills down the spine of the carbon world. If a few of them work, [Venezuela's Hugo] Chávez and [Iran's Mahmoud] Ahmadinejad are out of power."

Then again, the easiest way to blow up the energy world would be to stop wasting so much. That's the final link in the chain, a full-throttle push to make energy efficiency a national norm. The Recovery Act is weatherizing 250,000 homes this year. It gave homeowners rebates for energy-efficient appliances, much as the Cash for Clunkers program subsidized fuel-efficient cars. It's retrofitting juice-sucking server farms, factories and power plants; financing research into superefficient lighting, windows and machinery; and funneling billions into state and local efficiency efforts. (See TIME's special report "Obama's Agenda: Get America Back on Track.")

It will also retrofit 3 in 4 federal buildings. The U.S. government is the nation's largest energy consumer, so this will save big money while boosting demand for geothermal heat pumps, LED lighting and other energy-saving products. "We're so huge, we make markets," says Bob Peck, the General Services Administration's public-buildings commissioner. GSA's 93-year-old headquarters, now featuring clunky window air conditioners and wires duct-taped to ceilings, will get energy optimized heating, cooling and lighting systems, glass facades with solar membranes and a green roof; the makeover should cut its energy use 55%. It might even beta-test stimulus-funded windows that harvest sunlight. "We'll be the proving ground for innovation in the building industry," Peck says. "It all starts with renovating the government."

                                                 The New Venture Capitalists
The stimulus really is starting to change Washington — and not just the buildings. Every contract and lobbying contact is posted at Recovery.gov, with quarterly data detailing where the money went. A Recovery Board was created to scrutinize every dollar, with help from every major agency's independent watchdog. And Biden has promised state and local officials answers to all stimulus questions within 24 hours. It's a test-drive for a new approach to government: more transparent, more focused on results than compliance, not just bigger but better. Biden himself always saw the Recovery Act as a test — not only of the new Administration but of federal spending itself. He knew high-profile screwups could be fatal, stoking antigovernment anger about bureaucrats and two-car funerals. So he spends hours checking in, buttering up and banging heads to keep the stimulus on track, harassing Cabinet secretaries, governors and mayors about unspent broadband funds, weatherization delays and fishy projects. He has blocked some 260 skate parks, picnic tables and highway beautifications that flunked his what-would-your-mom-think test. "Imagine they could have proved we wasted a billion dollars," Biden says. "Gone, man. Gone!"

So far, despite furor over cash it supposedly funneled to contraception (deleted from the bill) and phantom congressional districts (simply typos), the earmark-free Recovery Act has produced surprisingly few scandals. Prosecutors are investigating a few fraud allegations, and critics have found some goofy expenditures, like $51,500 for water-safety-mascot costumes or a $50,000 arts grant to a kinky-film house. But those are minor warts, given that unprecedented scrutiny. Biden knows it's early — "I ain't saying mission accomplished!" — but he calls waste and fraud "the dogs that haven't barked." (See 25 people to blame for the financial crisis.)

The Recovery Act's deeper reform has been its focus on intense competition for grants instead of everybody-wins formulas, forcing public officials to consider not only whether applicants have submitted the required traffic studies and small-business hiring plans but also whether their projects make sense. Already staffed by top technologists from MIT, Duke and Intel, ARPA-E recruited 4,500 outside experts to winnow 3,700 applications down to 37 first-round grants. "We've taken the best and brightest from the tech world and created a venture fund — except we're looking for returns for the country," Majumdar says. These change agents didn't uproot their lives to fill out forms in triplicate and shovel money by formula. They want to reinvent the economy, not just stimulate it. Sadoway, the MIT battery scientist, is tired of reporting how many jobs he's created in his lab: "If this works, I'll create a million jobs!"

Obama has spent most of his first term trying to clean up messes — in the Gulf of Mexico, Iraq and Afghanistan, on Wall Street and Main Street — but the details in the stimulus plan are his real down payment on change. The question is which changes will last. Will electric cars disappear after the subsidies disappear? Will advanced battery factories migrate back to China? Will bullet trains ever get built? The President wants to extend transformative programs like ARPA-E. But would they be substitutes for the status quo or just additions to tack onto the deficit? And would they survive a Republican Congress?

Polls suggest the actual contents of the Recovery Act are popular. But the idea of the stimulus itself remains toxic — and probably will as long as the recovery remains tepid. "Today, it's judged by jobs," Rogers says of the act. "But in 10 years, it'll be judged by whether it transformed our economy."

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God Bless, Rad
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Steve
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« Reply #81 on: Sep 07, 2010, 08:20 PM »

Here is a piece by one of my favorite political bloggers, Digby, a female blogger.  She closes it by making an important point.
====================================================

They Think They Have A Democracy
by digby

If you're wondering why everyone's suddenly skittish about repealing the Bush tax cuts on high earners even though a large majority favors it, Kevin Drum has the answer:

    As research from Princeton political scientist Larry Bartels demonstrated several years ago, American politicians are powerfully affected by the views of the rich, and this has nothing to do with any recent electoral trends.

    Rather ... things have been this way for a long time. Using data from voting records in the early 90s, it shows that the responsiveness of senators to the views of the poor and working class is....zero. Or maybe even negative. And that's true for both parties. The middle class does better — again, with both parties — and high earners do better still. In fact, they do spectacularly better among Republican senators. And this disparity has almost certainly gotten even worse over the past two decades.

    This is the shape of American politics. If your income is low — and probably a fair number of the 56% who want Bush's tax cuts for the rich repealed are low-income voters — politicians simply don't care. If you're middle class they care a little more. But if you're rich, then they really, really care. And it's safe to say that most high earners are opposed to repealing tax cuts on high earners. That goes for all Republicans and a growing number of Democrats too. So what seems like a no-brainer isn't as simple as it looks. Economically it makes sense to repeal Bush's tax cuts for the rich, and a majority of American citizens are in favor of it. Unfortunately for them, they belong to the wrong majority. They're not rich themselves, and increasingly in America, that means their votes just don't count.


This is one reason why the plutocrats are financing a bunch of far-right freaks and zealots right now. It plays to fools and morons, of course. But it also forces normal people into a defensive crouch having to defend against theocrats, authoritarians and crackpots thus diverting their attention from this problem. It's very clever.
===========
Note for clarity: "Plutocrats" does not mean evolutionary astrologers.  Plutocracy means
1. Government by the wealthy.
2. A wealthy class that controls a government.
3. A government or state in which the wealthy rule.
And a plutocrat is one of the wealthy who are doing the ruling.
Remember the story about the two billionaire extreme right wing brothers who are funding the tea party movement and the extreme candidates running for office who are tea party favorites.
   Combined with corporate-controlled media support, now we know how complete moronic lunatics are potentially getting elected to the Senate.  And why.
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Rad
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« Reply #82 on: Sep 08, 2010, 08:54 AM »

"They're not rich themselves, and increasingly in America, that means their votes just don't count."

How long do you in America feel that it will be before you start hearing, from the rich and privileged, about who is 'qualified' to vote ? And of course that won't mean poor and 'uneducated' people will it. In a fascist Plutocratic country, that the USA is becoming, that is exactly where it leads so that the Plutocracy can be sustained. These are the very people who have 'conditioned' your population via the Corporate Media, who operates as a megaphone for these people, that the poor are to be despised. That the poor deserve nothing because they are responsible for their poorness, and that they are nothing but urchins who are seeking handouts from the government: which, as Steve pointed out, these Plutocrats simply don't care about. The poor are like vermin, and should be treated that way. They get in the way of ever more riches for the rich. I  even read recently of a politician in America who is proposing that the poor be rounded up and put into something like internment camps. So of course the words 'liberal' have also been demonized, and why Obama has been called a 'socialist' over and over by these Zarathustras. The last thing they would, or could, ever want is a social system that is equitable for all. God forbid. And how many of these people go to Christian Churches, and cross themselves ? And, at the same time, forget what Jesus taught about how the poor, downtrodden, and the outcasts are treated: "How you treat these people is how you treat me".

God Bless, Rad
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Katlil
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« Reply #83 on: Sep 08, 2010, 04:18 PM »

 

hear hear
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Steve
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« Reply #84 on: Sep 13, 2010, 09:41 AM »

Just before reading the article below I read another article how a California legislator has a bill pending to put radio chips in California license plates.  When a car is not moving, downloaded advertisements will play in a corner of its rear license plate, visible from the car behind it. California will charge advertisers for displaying their ads on car license plates.  A side effect of radio chips in license plates is government - police, etc. - will always know where every single California car is presently located.  The article states that so far this idea of ads on license plates has been treated with ridicule, and the bill is not getting anywhere.  However it also states many "experts" agree that within ten years license plates will have embedded radio chips.

That article was a good lead in to the tone of the one I am posting here.  I'm still taking it in.  I probably don't agree with everything said here, but also there is a lot of truth in what is said here. 

We started discussion previously on what we can do to prepare for the coming changes.  This article goes into some detail.  As much as possible take self out of the corporate state.  #1, do things that support your local economy.  Take your money out of megabanks, move it to local credit unions.  Use a credit union credit card.  Buy local produce - make it possible for local farmers to make a living.  Buy from farmer's market or food coop if possible.  Encourage others to do these too - established habits need to change. 

=================================================================

Do Not Pity the Democrats
By Chris Hedges
Sept 13th 2010

There are no longer any major institutions in American society, including the press, the educational system, the financial sector, labor unions, the arts, religious institutions and our dysfunctional political parties, which can be considered democratic. The intent, design and function of these institutions, controlled by corporate money, are to bolster the hierarchical and anti-democratic power of the corporate state. These institutions, often mouthing liberal values, abet and perpetuate mounting inequality. They operate increasingly in secrecy. They ignore suffering or sacrifice human lives for profit. They control and manipulate all levers of power and mass communication. They have muzzled the voices and concerns of citizens. They use entertainment, celebrity gossip and emotionally laden public-relations lies to seduce us into believing in a Disneyworld fantasy of democracy.

The menace we face does not come from the insane wing of the Republican Party, which may make huge inroads in the coming elections, but the institutions tasked with protecting democratic participation. Do not fear Glenn Beck or Sarah Palin. Do not fear the tea party movement, the birthers, the legions of conspiracy theorists or the militias. Fear the underlying corporate power structure, which no one, from Barack Obama to the right-wing nut cases who pollute the airwaves, can alter. If the hegemony of the corporate state is not soon broken we will descend into a technologically enhanced age of barbarism.

Investing emotional and intellectual energy in electoral politics is a waste of time. Resistance means a radical break with the formal structures of American society. We must cut as many ties with consumer society and corporations as possible. We must build a new political and economic consciousness centered on the tangible issues of sustainable agriculture, self-sufficiency and radical environmental reform. The democratic system, and the liberal institutions that once made piecemeal reform possible, is dead. It exists only in name. It is no longer a viable mechanism for change. And the longer we play our scripted and absurd role in this charade the worse it will get. Do not pity Barack Obama and the Democratic Party. They will get what they deserve. They sold the citizens out for cash and power. They lied. They manipulated and deceived the public, from the bailouts to the abandonment of universal health care, to serve corporate interests. They refused to halt the wanton corporate destruction of the ecosystem on which all life depends. They betrayed the most basic ideals of democracy.  And they, as much as the Republicans, are the problem.

“It is like being in a pit,” Ralph Nader told me when we spoke on Saturday. “If you are four feet in the pit you have a chance to grab the top and hoist yourself up. If you are 30 feet in the pit you have to start on a different scale.”

All resistance will take place outside the arena of electoral politics. The more we expand community credit unions, community health clinics and food cooperatives and build alternative energy systems, the more empowered we will become.

“To the extent that these organizations expand and get into communities where they do not exist, we will weaken the multinational goliath, from the banks to the agribusinesses to the HMO giants and hospital chains,” Nader said.

The failure of liberals to defend the interests of working men and women as our manufacturing sector was dismantled, labor unions were destroyed and social services were slashed has proved to be a disastrous and fatal misjudgment. Liberals, who betrayed the working class, have no credibility. This is one of the principle reasons the anti-war movement cannot attract the families whose sons and daughters are fighting and dying in Iraq and Afghanistan. And liberal hypocrisy has opened the door for a virulent right wing. If we are to reconnect with the working class we will have to begin from zero. We will have to rebuild the ties with the poor and the working class which the liberal establishment severed. We will have to condemn the liberal class as vociferously as we condemn the right wing. And we will have to remain true to the moral imperative to foster the common good and the tangible needs of housing, health care, jobs, education and food.

We will, once again, be bombarded in this election cycle with messages of fear from the Democratic Party—designed, in the end, to serve corporate interests. “Better Barack Obama than Sarah Palin,” we will be told. Better the sane technocrats like Larry Summers than half-wits like John Bolton. But this time we must resist. If we express the legitimate rage of the dispossessed working class as our own, if we denounce and refuse to cooperate with the Democratic Party, we can begin to impede the march of the right-wing trolls who seem destined to inherit power. If we again prove compliant we will discredit the socialism we should be offering as an alternative to a perverted Christian and corporate fascism.

The tea party movement is, as Nader points out, “a conviction revolt.” Most of the participants in the tea party rallies are not poor. They are small-business people and professionals. They feel that something is wrong. They see that the two parties are equally responsible for the subsidies and bailouts, the wars and the deficits. They know these parties must be replaced. The corporate state, whose interests are being championed by tea party leaders such as Palin and Dick Armey, is working hard to make sure the anger of the movement is directed toward government rather than corporations and Wall Street. And if these corporate apologists succeed, a more overt form of corporate fascism will emerge without a socialist counterweight.

 “Poor people do not organize,” Nader lamented. “They never have. It has always been people who have fairly good jobs. You don’t see Wal-Mart workers massing anywhere. The people who are the most militant are the people who had the best blue-collar jobs. Their expectation level was high. When they felt their jobs were being jeopardized they got really angry. But when you are at $7.25 an hour you want to hang on to $7.25 an hour. It is a strange thing.”
“People have institutionalized oppressive power in the form of surrender,” Nader said. “It is not that they like it. But what are you going to do about it? You make the best of it. The system of control is staggeringly dictatorial. It breaks new ground and innovates in ways no one in human history has ever innovated. You start in American history where these corporations have influence. Then they have lobbyists. Then they run candidates. Then they put their appointments in top government positions. Now, they are actually operating the government. Look at Halliburton and Blackwater. Yesterday someone in our office called the Office of Pipeline Safety apropos the San Bruno explosion in California. The press woman answered. The guy in our office saw on the screen that she had CTR next to her name. He said, ‘What is CTR?’ She said, ‘I am a contractor.’ He said, ‘This is the press office at the Department of Transportation. They contracted out the press office?’ ‘Yes,’ she said, ‘but that’s OK, I come to work here every day.’ ”

“The corporate state is the ultimate maturation of American-type fascism,” Nader said. “They leave wide areas of personal freedom so that people can confuse personal freedom with civic freedom—the freedom to go where you want, eat where you want, associate with who you want, buy what you want, work where you want, sleep when you want, play when you want. If people have given up on any civic or political role for themselves there is a sufficient amount of elbow room to get through the day. They do not have the freedom to participate in the decisions about war, foreign policy, domestic health and safety issues, taxes or transportation. That is its genius. But one of its Achilles’ heels is that the price of the corporate state is a deteriorating political economy. They can’t stop their greed from getting the next morsel. The question is, at what point are enough people going to have a breaking point in terms of their own economic plight? At what point will they say enough is enough? When that happens, is a tea party type enough or [Sen. Robert M.] La Follette or Eugene Debs type of enough?”

It is anti-corporate movements as exemplified by the Scandinavian energy firm Kraft&Kultur that we must emulate. Kraft&Kultur sells electricity exclusively from solar and water power. It has begun to merge clean energy with cultural events, bookstores and a political consciousness that actively defies corporate hegemony.

The failure by the Obama administration to use the bailout and stimulus money to build public works such as schools, libraries, roads, clinics, highways, public transit and reclaiming dams, as well as create green jobs, has snuffed out any hope of serious economic, political or environmental reform coming from the centralized bureaucracy of the corporate state. And since the government did not hire enough auditors and examiners to monitor how the hundreds of billions in taxpayer funds funneled to Wall Street are being spent, we will soon see reports of widespread mismanagement and corruption. The rot and corruption at the top levels of our financial and political systems, coupled with the increasing deprivation felt by tens of millions of Americans, are volatile tinder for a horrific right-wing backlash in the absence of a committed socialist alternative.   

“If you took a day off and did nothing but listen to Hannity, Beck and Limbaugh and realized that this goes on 260 days a year, you would see that it is overwhelming,” Nader said. “You have to almost have a genetic resistance in your mind and body not to be affected by it. These guys are very good. They are clever. They are funny. They are emotional. It beats me how Air America didn’t make it, except it went after [it criticized] corporations, and corporations advertise. These right-wingers go after government, and government doesn’t advertise. And that is the difference. It isn’t that their message appeals more. Air America starved because it could not get ads.”

We do not have much time left. And the longer we refuse to confront corporate power the more impotent we become as society breaks down. The game of electoral politics, which is given legitimacy by the right and the so-called left on the cable news shows, is just that—a game. It diverts us from what should be our daily task—dismantling, piece by piece, the iron grip that corporations hold over our lives. Hope is a word that is applicable only to those who grasp reality, however bleak, and do something meaningful to fight back—which does not include the farce of elections and involvement in mainstream political parties. Hope is about fighting against the real forces of destruction, not chanting “Yes We Can!” in rallies orchestrated by marketing experts, television crews, pollsters and propagandists or begging Obama to be Obama. Hope, in the hands of realists, spreads fear into the black heart of the corporate elite. But hope, real hope, remains thwarted by our collective self-delusion.
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Elen
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« Reply #85 on: Sep 14, 2010, 06:49 AM »

Great article, Steve.  I couldn't agree more with it.  Here are a couple quotes that I particularly noticed.

All resistance will take place outside the arena of electoral politics. The more we expand community credit unions, community health clinics and food cooperatives and build alternative energy systems, the more empowered we will become."

The question is, at what point are enough people going to have a breaking point in terms of their own economic plight? At what point will they say enough is enough?"

To me, the 1st quote does really seem to be the solution.  And the answers to the questions in the 2nd quote seem to be why the 1st isn't happening en masse.  I don't know of anyone who doesn't get that things are screwed up.  Yet I know of only a handful who seem to make the connection between what is wrong and their own everyday habits and conditioned beliefs, ie, simply accepting corporate control through their regular, daily purchases.  Right now, it seems to be about holding one's own; everything's screwed up, but I'm mananging, so no changes are made individually.  Things have to change; someone "out there" will do it.  So, will only major disaster, affecting millions at a time, force change?  The big fear I have is that, the longer we wait, the more corporations will take control of the "local" movement, and thus we will have a feel-good face on the same old thing.

Ellen
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Steve
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« Reply #86 on: Sep 14, 2010, 11:46 AM »

Hi Ellen

All resistance will take place outside the arena of electoral politics. The more we expand community credit unions, community health clinics and food cooperatives and build alternative energy systems, the more empowered we will become."

The question is, at what point are enough people going to have a breaking point in terms of their own economic plight? At what point will they say enough is enough?"

To me, the 1st quote does really seem to be the solution.  And the answers to the questions in the 2nd quote seem to be why the 1st isn't happening en masse.  I don't know of anyone who doesn't get that things are screwed up.  Yet I know of only a handful who seem to make the connection between what is wrong and their own everyday habits and conditioned beliefs, ie, simply accepting corporate control through their regular, daily purchases.  Right now, it seems to be about holding one's own; everything's screwed up, but I'm mananging, so no changes are made individually.  Things have to change; someone "out there" will do it.  So, will only major disaster, affecting millions at a time, force change?  The big fear I have is that, the longer we wait, the more corporations will take control of the "local" movement, and thus we will have a feel-good face on the same old thing.

You have to give corporations a dark sort of credit for the near-genius way they handle the issues you mention.  Equating in people's minds patriotism and freedom with following policies that give corporations the legal right to take over everything possible.  They keep most people's attention intentionally focused in the wrong direction.  None of this has anything to do with corporations.  It's all ACORN's fault, Mexican immigrants' fault, Muslim terrorist's fault, Clinton's fault, Obama's fault.  The housing crisis was due to Ted Kennedy wanting poor (i.e. not white American) people to own homes they couldn't afford.  It had nothing whatsoever to do with bank fraud and greed. 

Unfortunately I've noticed for a long time Americans vote their pocketbook.  Clinton beat Daddy Bush because "it's the economy, stupid". If times had not been hard, Bush probably would have won.  Republicans seem to have learned from that.  They've created an impossible situation for Obama.  It looks like they will get away with pinning the blame for the economic mess on Obama, even though the roots of it are all in the Bush admin.  There's increasing evidence many Americans are falling for the ruse and may put in office Republicans who are even more extreme than those we created this situation in the first place. 

I share your concerns about the potential coopting of local movements.  They will coopt everything they possibly can - its not a conspiracy, its just the nature of what they do.  Seeing "profit opportunities" everywhere, as if money and profit is the bottom line of everything worthwhile in life.

Ultimately I think it will come down to what Jeffery said for years, that circumstantial necessity will require mutation and adaptation for survival.  In the coming corporate reality there will be millions of losers, those who fall through the cracks and can't find their way back up.  Its starting with millions who have lost and are losing homes, and those laid off from cushy corporate jobs.  Many of these people will get sucked in and vote for tea party candidates, having been made to believe its Obama's policies that made all this happen.   When Republicans are next returned to power the corporate reality will consolidate its power (Pluto in Cap). 

As far as pushback, July 4th 1776 had Pluto at 27 Cap.  This occurs again in 2021/2022. Pluto in Cap is followed by Pluto in Aquarius.  Rebellion begins when people feel they have less to lose upsetting the status quo than by sustaining it. It takes a lot to move a mass population to that point - 70% is consensus, which accepts the status quo.   Rebellion usually starts with the young - they have vitality and have less to lose and more to gain by rocking the boat.  Keep eyes on what the young are feeling and doing as this progresses.
Steve
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Rad
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« Reply #87 on: Sep 14, 2010, 02:19 PM »

All,

 In an earlier post on this thread it was pointed out about the nature of the aging (Capricorn/Pluto transit in Capricorn) infrastructures throughout American. And with the Pluto transit through geodetics coming across the USA for many, many years to come that many, many of these various infrastructures, bridges, dams, pipelines, etc would fail can potentially create cataclysmic events: Pluto in Capricorn squaring Uranus in Aries. With this in mind, please read below.

God Bless, Rad

**************************************************************************

                                Aging gas pipe at risk of explosion nationwide

By The Associated Press
Tuesday, September 14th, 2010 -- 7:21 am



Aging gas pipe at risk of explosion nationwide: Pipeline explosion near San Francisco highlights dangers of gas infrastructure.

The tragic explosion of a gas pipeline in a San Francisco suburb has shed light on a problem usually kept underground: Communities have expanded over pipes built decades earlier when no one lived there.

Utilities have been under pressure for years to better inspect and replace aging gas pipes — many of them laid years before sprawling communities were erected around them — that now are at risk of leaking or erupting.

But the effort has fallen short. Critics say the regulatory system is ripe for problems because the government largely leaves it up to the companies to do inspections, and utilities are reluctant to spend the money necessary to properly fix and replace decrepit pipelines.

"If this was the FAA and air travel we were talking about, I wouldn't get on a plane," said Rick Kessler, a former congressional staffer specializing in pipeline safety issues who now works for the Pipeline Safety Trust, an advocacy group based in Bellingham, Wash.
Story continues below...

Investigators are still trying to figure out how the pipeline in San Bruno ruptured and ignited a gigantic fireball that torched one home after another in the neighborhood, killing at least four people. Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the pipeline's owner, said Monday it has set aside up to $100 million to help residents recover.

Experts say the California disaster epitomizes the risks that communities face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right around the life expectancy for steel pipes. It was part of a transmission line that in one section had an "unacceptably high" risk of failure. And it was in a densely populated area.

The blast was the latest warning sign in a series of deadly infrastructure failures in recent years, including a bridge collapse in Minneapolis and a steam pipe explosion that tore open a Manhattan street in 2007. The steam pipe that ruptured was more than 80 years old.

The section of pipeline that ruptured was built in 1956, back when the neighborhood contained only a handful of homes. It is a scenario that National Transportation Safety Board vice chairman Christopher Hart has seen play out throughout the nation, as suburbs have expanded.

"That's an issue we're going to have to look on a bigger scale — situations in which pipes of some age were put in before the dense population arrived and now the dense population is right over the pipe," he said.

Thousands of pipelines nationwide fit the same bill, and they frequently experience mishaps. Federal officials have recorded 2,840 significant gas pipeline accidents since 1990, more than a third causing deaths and significant injuries.

Hart said the tragedy in San Bruno could push other states to begin tougher inspections of their lines.

"It would surprise me if other states didn't see this and learn from it and be proactive with it," Hart said.

Congress passed a law in 2002 that required utilities for the first time to inspect pipelines that run through heavily populated areas. In the first five years, more than 3,000 problems were identified — a figure Weimer said underscores the precarious pipeline system.

Even when inspections are done and problems found, Kessler said, there is no requirement for companies to say if or what kind of repairs were made. And Weimer added industry lobbyists have since pushed to relax that provision of the law so inspections could occur once a decade or once every 15 years.

Other critics complain that the pipeline plans are drafted in secret with little opportunity for the public to speak out about the process.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is the federal regulatory arm that enforces rules for the safe operation of the nation's pipeline system, and has direct authority over interstate pipelines. Most state public utility agencies have adopted the federal rules and carry out inspections and enforcement of pipelines running inside state boundaries.

But the system often relies on the pipeline operators like PG&E to survey their own gas lines and to decide which pipelines are high risk.

The American Gas Association disputes the notion that it cuts any corners and says the industry is subjected to stringent state and federal regulations.

"Safety is unequivocally the No. 1 priority for the natural gas transmission and distribution industry and always will be," spokesman Chris Hogan said. "The industry spends billions each year to ensure the safety and reliability of the natural gas infrastructure."

California regulators say current rules are written in a way that relies on industry to report problems and set timetables for repair.

"We're set up to provide an incentive and a deterrent and to make sure they follow the rules, but we generally avoid telling them how to run their system," said Julie Halligan, deputy director for consumer protection and safety at the California Public Utilities Commission. "They can't endlessly defer things and get away with it, because we'll be looking after the fact to see what they've done."

The challenge of ensuring pipeline safety is compounded by the sheer enormity of the nation's natural gas network. The federal pipeline agency says the U.S. has more than 2 million miles of pipelines — enough to circle the earth about 100 times.

The agency has only about 100 federal inspectors nationwide to ensure compliance, meaning there is no guarantee violators will be caught. "When you look at two-and-a-half million miles of pipeline with 100 inspectors, it's not reassuring," Weimer said. "To a grand degree the industry inspects and polices themselves."

Potential safety threats have grown as the pipeline network has expanded and age takes its toll on existing infrastructure. More than 60 percent of the nation's gas transmission lines are 40 years old or older.

Most of them are made of steel, with older varieties prone to corrosion. The more problematic pipes are made of cast-iron. A few places in Pennsylvania still had wooden gas pipes as of last year, according to officials there.

Pipelines in heavily populated locations like San Bruno fall into a category the industry refers to as "high consequence areas."

Those areas contain about 7 percent of the 300,000 miles of gas transmission lines in the country, or roughly 21,000 miles of pipeline. The category has nothing to do with the safety of pipelines, and was created to put the greatest emphasis on the most populous regions.

Industry watchdogs have criticized utilities for not being willing to spend the money necessary to avoid explosions like the one in California. The cost to replace lengthy stretches of pipelines can exceed $30 million.

"They (PG&E) will prioritize and put off work to maintain their level of earnings," said Bill Marcus, a California attorney whose firm consults nationally with consumer protection agencies and nonprofits on gas rate cases. "To some extent that's not bad, but it is concerning when those decisions endanger public health or the environment."

PG&E said it has spent more than $100 million to improve its gas system in recent years, and routinely surveys its 5,724 miles of transmission and 42,142 miles of distribution lines for leaks. The utility speeded up surveys of its distribution lines in 2008 and expects to have completed checks in December, it said.

PG&E President Chris Johns said the pipe that ruptured was inspected twice in the past year — once for corrosion and once for leaks — and the checks turned up no problems.

A section of pipe connected to the line that exploded was built in 1948, and flagged as a problem by PG&E in a memo. PG&E submitted paperwork to regulators that said the section was within "the top 100 highest risk line sections" in the utility's service territory, the document shows.

The fact that it's in an urbanized area that didn't exist when the pipe was built is emblematic of a bigger problem nationwide, experts say.

"People have been waiting for a while for this type of disaster to happen because of expanded construction near pipeline right of ways without adequate prevention," said Paul Blackburn, a public interest lawyer in Vermillion, S.D.

___

Associated Press writer Matthew Brown in Billings, Mont., contributed to this report
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Elen
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« Reply #88 on: Sep 14, 2010, 02:25 PM »

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your response.  Just a couple of brief comments in bold..


Hi Ellen

All resistance will take place outside the arena of electoral politics. The more we expand community credit unions, community health clinics and food cooperatives and build alternative energy systems, the more empowered we will become."

The question is, at what point are enough people going to have a breaking point in terms of their own economic plight? At what point will they say enough is enough?"

To me, the 1st quote does really seem to be the solution.  And the answers to the questions in the 2nd quote seem to be why the 1st isn't happening en masse.  I don't know of anyone who doesn't get that things are screwed up.  Yet I know of only a handful who seem to make the connection between what is wrong and their own everyday habits and conditioned beliefs, ie, simply accepting corporate control through their regular, daily purchases.  Right now, it seems to be about holding one's own; everything's screwed up, but I'm mananging, so no changes are made individually.  Things have to change; someone "out there" will do it.  So, will only major disaster, affecting millions at a time, force change?  The big fear I have is that, the longer we wait, the more corporations will take control of the "local" movement, and thus we will have a feel-good face on the same old thing.

You have to give corporations a dark sort of credit for the near-genius way they handle the issues you mention.  Equating in people's minds patriotism and freedom with following policies that give corporations the legal right to take over everything possible.  They keep most people's attention intentionally focused in the wrong direction.  None of this has anything to do with corporations.  It's all ACORN's fault, Mexican immigrants' fault, Muslim terrorist's fault, Clinton's fault, Obama's fault.  The housing crisis was due to Ted Kennedy wanting poor (i.e. not white American) people to own homes they couldn't afford.  It had nothing whatsoever to do with bank fraud and greed.

Yes, brilliant.  And thank you for naming that with such clarity. 

Unfortunately I've noticed for a long time Americans vote their pocketbook.  Clinton beat Daddy Bush because "it's the economy, stupid". If times had not been hard, Bush probably would have won.  Republicans seem to have learned from that.  They've created an impossible situation for Obama.  It looks like they will get away with pinning the blame for the economic mess on Obama, even though the roots of it are all in the Bush admin.  There's increasing evidence many Americans are falling for the ruse and may put in office Republicans who are even more extreme than those we created this situation in the first place. 

I share your concerns about the potential coopting of local movements.  They will coopt everything they possibly can - its not a conspiracy, its just the nature of what they do. 

Much like what they did with the organic food movement. While it is possible to find genuine, legitimate organic food, the movement lost the battle when the organic industry was being regulated.  Once it is clear, as you say, that money can be made, danger abounds.


Seeing "profit opportunities" everywhere, as if money and profit is the bottom line of everything worthwhile in life.

My own personal hope is that we will find a way to organize our communities and relations in a way that no longer requires money.  Money has definitely taken our focus off of what matters - personal growth and being of service to others.  So many people expend their energies on jobs they don't care about because it is the only way to make money.  Imagine if that were not a concern.  Imagine if people could pursue their dreams and thus TRULY contribute to society.  And if they failed, if they were not good enough, say, to join a particular program of interest, there is a safety net there for them to figure out what else they can do.  Think of how much dysfunction arises from the experience of feeling "less than" due to this competitive world.  People always having to feel they're better than others.  Well, no money, no competition.  There's enough for everyone, so why compete.  And I just don't buy it that, without money, no one would be motivated to do anything.  I think they would be motivated by different things, and that is a good thing in my book.


Ultimately I think it will come down to what Jeffery said for years, that circumstantial necessity will require mutation and adaptation for survival.  In the coming corporate reality there will be millions of losers, those who fall through the cracks and can't find their way back up. 

Yes, this seems all too clear.  Deeply saddening.

 Its starting with millions who have lost and are losing homes, and those laid off from cushy corporate jobs.  Many of these people will get sucked in and vote for tea party candidates, having been made to believe its Obama's policies that made all this happen.   When Republicans are next returned to power the corporate reality will consolidate its power (Pluto in Cap). 


Again, sadly, this seems likely.

As far as pushback, July 4th 1776 had Pluto at 27 Cap.  This occurs again in 2021/2022.

Wow, that is so far away.  Somehow that is just sinkingin now.  But that is Pluto - slow, drawn out, thorough.  Seems we will have to feel every bit of it.

Pluto in Cap is followed by Pluto in Aquarius.  Rebellion begins when people feel they have less to lose upsetting the status quo than by sustaining it. It takes a lot to move a mass population to that point - 70% is consensus, which accepts the status quo.   Rebellion usually starts with the young - they have vitality and have less to lose and more to gain by rocking the boat.  Keep eyes on what the young are feeling and doing as this progresses.
Steve

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Elen
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« Reply #89 on: Sep 14, 2010, 02:39 PM »

Hi Rad,

Thanks for the articles you've been posting.  Here's a quote from the last one:

"They (PG&E) will prioritize and put off work to maintain their level of earnings," said Bill Marcus, a California attorney whose firm consults nationally with consumer protection agencies and nonprofits on gas rate cases. "To some extent that's not bad, but it is concerning when those decisions endanger public health or the environment."

This, to me, is exactly the problem. Profit.  Earnings. With corporations in control and the profit motive God, the future seems inevitable.  Life is worthless.  Sanity and peace are worthless.  Kindness - worthless.  Caring and concern for the welfare of others - worthless.  What matters is profit for the few in control.  And a government clearly powerless to do anything.

Ellen
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